Sort by:
Monday
27 Apr
15:00 - 18:05
IAHSI Academy
The academy meeting
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Reinhold Haux
Monday
27 Apr
14:00 - 18:00
EFMI Board
Board meeting
Member only
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
Tuesday
28 Apr
10:30 - 16:45
EFMI Council
Council meeting EFMI
Member only
Room: 5 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Lacramioara Stoicu-Tivadar
Tuesday
28 Apr
09:00 - 15:30
IMIA Board
IMIA Board meeting
Member only
Room: 11 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 18)
Tuesday
28 Apr
09:00 - 15:30
Snomed French
French meeting Somed CT
On invitation only
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
542 Green HC
Towards a green healthcare industry – recognize opportunities from a Lean perspective (M Sijm-Eeken, H Ossebaard, L Peute)
Even though the healthcare sector’s aim is to protect and promote health, it is responsible for 4,4% of the world’s climate emissions which is a similar footprint as over 500 coal-fired powerplants. Climate change is perceived as a “health emergency“ but also as “(…) the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century”. The Lancet Countdown initiative is an international collaboration of 24 academic institutions and intergovernmental organizations. It tracks progress on health and climate change and provides an independent assessment of the health effects of climate change, the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the health implications of these actions. In their recent November 2019 report they write: “The life of every child born today will be profoundly affected by climate change. Without accelerated intervention, this new era will come to define the health of people at every stage of their lives”. Many other authoritative, scientific resources confirm this analysis and propose appropriate action.
Today’s challenge is therefore to develop a more sustainable health care system and to realize ‘green’ care in terms of lower CO2 emission, circular work, reduced medicine pollution and healthy environments for both patients and professionals.
Medical Informatics provides knowledge and tools to green solutions that lower the environmental impact of health care. Examples can be found in the application of telemedicine, tele-monitoring and other digital health care innovations. The use of green datacenter solutions, cloud technologies and data science provide effective examples that reduce energy use, overtreatment, waste, car travel, water and carbon footprint as well as related cost.
Such green solutions take time to develop, implement and evaluate. However to accelerate sustainability in the full spectrum of health care, immediate change is imperative.
Current evidence is lacking on an approach that could help employees who are involved in healthcare delivery, support, or policy development with recognizing opportunities for reducing the ecological footprint in healthcare processes.

To take action and reduce the climate footprint of the healthcare industry, a first step is to be aware of the impact and get insight in how and where the healthcare processes are impacting the environment. A next step is to look for potential changes that could help reduce the ecological footprint of healthcare.
The Lean methodology has a proven track of record in optimizing processes by reducing waste in healthcare processes. Reducing waste helps to lower climate impact and deliver ‘green healthcare’. Hence we have developed a Lean-based approach to support the identification of opportunities that could help with reducing the climate impact of healthcare processes.
The first goal of this workshop is to make the attendees aware of the contribution of the healthcare sector to the global climate change. The second goal is that the attendees learn how to recognize opportunities for reducing climate footprint in their own work environment, by applying a Lean perspective.
Participants of the workshop will be able to apply a simple Lean waste analysis in their own working environment resulting in the identification of feasible improvements for reducing climate impact.
Room: 3 (Location: Level 0, Number of seats: 108)
Chair(s): Marieke Sijm-Eeken
13:45 - 15:15
Towards a green healthcare industry – recognize opportunities from a Lean perspective (Marieke Sijm-Eeken, Hans Ossebaard, Linda Peute)
Even though the healthcare sector’s aim is to protect and promote health, it is responsible for 4,4% of the world’s climate emissions which is a similar footprint as over 500 coal-fired powerplants. Climate change is perceived as a “health emergency“ but also as “(…) the greatest global health opportunity of the 21st century”. The Lancet Countdown initiative is an international collaboration of 24 academic institutions and intergovernmental organizations. It tracks progress on health and climate change and provides an independent assessment of the health effects of climate change, the implementation of the Paris Agreement and the health implications of these actions. In their recent November 2019 report they write: “The life of every child born today will be profoundly affected by climate change. Without accelerated intervention, this new era will come to define the health of people at every stage of their lives”. Many other authoritative, scientific resources confirm this analysis and propose appropriate action.

Today’s challenge is therefore to develop a more sustainable health care system and to realize ‘green’ care in terms of lower CO2 emission, circular work, reduced medicine pollution and healthy environments for both patients and professionals.

Medical Informatics provides knowledge and tools to green solutions that lower the environmental impact of health care. Examples can be found in the application of telemedicine, tele-monitoring and other digital health care innovations. The use of green datacenter solutions, cloud technologies and data science provide effective examples that reduce energy use, overtreatment, waste, car travel, water and carbon footprint as well as related cost.
Such green solutions take time to develop, implement and evaluate. However to accelerate sustainability in the full spectrum of health care, immediate change is imperative.
Current evidence is lacking on an approach that could help employees who are involved in healthcare delivery, support, or policy development with recognizing opportunities for reducing the ecological footprint in healthcare processes.

To take action and reduce the climate footprint of the healthcare industry, a first step is to be aware of the impact and get insight in how and where the healthcare processes are impacting the environment. A next step is to look for potential changes that could help reduce the ecological footprint of healthcare.
The Lean methodology has a proven track of record in optimizing processes by reducing waste in healthcare processes. Reducing waste helps to lower climate impact and deliver ‘green healthcare’. Hence we have developed a Lean-based approach to support the identification of opportunities that could help with reducing the climate impact of healthcare processes.
The first goal of this workshop is to make the attendees aware of the contribution of the healthcare sector to the global climate change. The second goal is that the attendees learn how to recognize opportunities for reducing climate footprint in their own work environment, by applying a Lean perspective.

Participants of the workshop will be able to apply a simple Lean waste analysis in their own working environment resulting in the identification of feasible improvements for reducing climate impact.
Mrs. Drs. Marieke Sijm-Eeken
Mr. Hans Ossebaard
National Healthcare Institute
Ms. Dr. Linda Peute
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
543 Tensorflow
TensorFlow for beginners. How to build your first deep learning models using R. (T Drake, R Ots, L Norman, E Harrison)
Deep learning and machine learning are now at the forefront of medical informatics. Developments in this area are heralded to deliver vast improvements in patient care and personalised medicine. TensorFlow is an open source library developed by Google and allows the development and deployment of flexible deep learning neural networks. Until recently, using TensorFlow in R was challenging, with most users interacting with TensorFlow through the Python API. Recent developments have now made it possible to use TensorFlow through the RStudio interface to integrate deep learning neural networks into healthcare data analysis. In this lively and interactive workshop, the HealthyR team will take you through a taster of what TensorFlow can do for you.
Outcome
We aim to provide participants with a framework for using TensorFlow in R and discuss considerations for using machine learning. We will also provide examples of ‘Explainable deep learning’ methods to address the criticisms around the ‘black box’ of machine learning.
Programme
Using a similar model to our HealthyR course (www.healthyR.surgicalinformatics.org), we will take you through the programme using a mixture of short talks, interactive presentations and opportunity to use TensorFlow in real time. Should you wish to participate in the practical demonstration, we will provide course materials and access to a server with RStudio and TensorFlow pre-installed. A good working proficiency in R is required, preferably with knowledge of the tidyverse (www.tidyverse.org).
We will start by briefly summarising the advantages of TensorFlow, its capabilities and explain the workflow in RStudio. Throughout the session, we will use the Keras library to interact with TensorFlow. An interactive demonstration will then follow, covering how to format data for processing, how to generate training and validation ‘recipes’ and how to run the network.
Participants will have the opportunity for practical analysis of data. We have dedicated a half hour session to the practical application of TensorFlow to a complex (synthetic) healthcare dataset, centred around an important clinical problem of predicting cancer recurrence (return) after surgery. During the session our tutors will circulate around the room to answer any questions.
Deep learning models have been heavily criticised over their ‘black box’ attributes, as it is far more difficult to understand how these models work compared with conventional techniques. We will spend 5 minutes at the end of the practical session with a live demonstration of methods which can make TensorFlow deep learning more explainable.
Finally, we will leave ample time at the end of the workshop for our tutors to answer any questions or troubleshoot code.
Room: 4 (Location: Level 0, Number of seats: 108)
Chair(s): Thomas Drake
13:45 - 15:15
TensorFlow for beginners. How to build your first deep learning models using R. (Thomas Drake, Riinu Ots, Lisa Norman, Ewen Harrison)
Rationale
Deep learning and machine learning are now at the forefront of medical informatics. Developments in this area are heralded to deliver vast improvements in patient care and personalised medicine. TensorFlow is an open source library developed by Google and allows the development and deployment of flexible deep learning neural networks. Until recently, using TensorFlow in R was challenging, with most users interacting with TensorFlow through the Python API. Recent developments have now made it possible to use TensorFlow through the RStudio interface to integrate deep learning neural networks into healthcare data analysis. In this lively and interactive workshop, the HealthyR team will take you through a taster of what TensorFlow can do for you.
Outcome
We aim to provide participants with a framework for using TensorFlow in R and discuss considerations for using machine learning. We will also provide examples of ‘Explainable deep learning’ methods to address the criticisms around the ‘black box’ of machine learning.
Programme
Using a similar model to our HealthyR course (www.healthyR.surgicalinformatics.org), we will take you through the programme using a mixture of short talks, interactive presentations and opportunity to use TensorFlow in real time. Should you wish to participate in the practical demonstration, we will provide course materials and access to a server with RStudio and TensorFlow pre-installed. A good working proficiency in R is required, preferably with knowledge of the tidyverse (www.tidyverse.org).
We will start by briefly summarising the advantages of TensorFlow, its capabilities and explain the workflow in RStudio. Throughout the session, we will use the Keras library to interact with TensorFlow. An interactive demonstration will then follow, covering how to format data for processing, how to generate training and validation ‘recipes’ and how to run the network.
Participants will have the opportunity for practical analysis of data. We have dedicated a half hour session to the practical application of TensorFlow to a complex (synthetic) healthcare dataset, centred around an important clinical problem of predicting cancer recurrence (return) after surgery. During the session our tutors will circulate around the room to answer any questions.
Deep learning models have been heavily criticised over their ‘black box’ attributes, as it is far more difficult to understand how these models work compared with conventional techniques. We will spend 5 minutes at the end of the practical session with a live demonstration of methods which can make TensorFlow deep learning more explainable.
Finally, we will leave ample time at the end of the workshop for our tutors to answer any questions or troubleshoot code.
Mr. Dr. Thomas Drake
University of Edinburgh
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
546 IMIA EBN
IMIA Evidence Based Practice Workshop - Getting Nursing Informatics Evidence into Practice (R Cook, UM Kinnunen, L Hardy)
Evidence based nursing informatics is crucial in the development and implementation of digital health solutions and continuous development of evidence based practice in Nursing. The IMIA Nursing Informatics Working Groups’ Evidence Based Practice Working Group aim is to share evidence based and best practice nursing informatics, through international contributions and collaborations from nursing and health informaticians globally and house the knowledge within the Linked In Big Data Nursing Knowledge Database. This workshop objective is to establish the European participation and contributions to the knowledge eRepository.
One of the challenges for nursing informatics is how to ensure that nursing knowledge and evidence based practice is integrated into the design and use of digital health solutions, provide the data for continuous improvement and the ongoing development of nursing knowledge globally.
The expected outcome of the workshop are presented as learning objectives. The participants will be able to:
Understand the importance of evidence based best practices in NI and its value to nursing
Identify and action opportunities for sharing evidence based nursing informatics practice globally
Recognize and provide recommendations to address the challenges of sharing evidence based practice in nursing informatics
Provide recommendations for the knowledge constructs and management of the nursing informatics evidence based practice eRepository to support global collaboration and knowledge sharing.
The evidence based practice WG is seeking global engagement and participation to contribute to and share knowledge and experiences. To this end it is proposed to conduct a workshop to explore the concepts and challenges and develop an action plan.
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Robyn Cook
13:45 - 15:15
IMIA Evidence Based Practice Workshop - Getting Nursing Informatics Evidence into Practice (Robyn Cook, Ulla-Mari Kinnunen, Lyn Hardy)
IMIA Evidence-based Practice Workshop – Getting Nursing Informatics Evidence into Practice
Robyn COOK[1] a , Ulla-Mari KINNUNEN b Charlotte WEAVER c
a , Co-Chair Evidence Based Practice Working Group, IMIA SIGNI.
b Department of Health and Social Management, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland
c Co-Chair Evidence Based Practice Working Group, IMIA SIGNI
Evidence based nursing informatics is crucial in the development and implementation of digital health solutions and continuous development of evidence based practice in Nursing. The IMIA Nursing Informatics Working Groups’ Evidence Based Practice Working Group aim is to share evidence based and best practice nursing informatics, through international contributions and collaborations from nursing and health informaticians globally and house the knowledge within the Linked In Big Data Nursing Knowledge Database. This workshop objective is to establish the European participation and contributions to the knowledge eRepository.
One of the challenges for nursing informatics is how to ensure that nursing knowledge and evidence based practice is integrated into the design and use of digital health solutions, provide the data for continuous improvement and the ongoing development of nursing knowledge globally.
The expected outcome of the workshop are presented as learning objectives. The participants will be able to:
Understand the importance of evidence based best practices in NI and its value to nursing
Identify and action opportunities for sharing evidence based nursing informatics practice globally
Recognize and provide recommendations to address the challenges of sharing evidence based practice in nursing informatics
Provide recommendations for the knowledge constructs and management of the nursing informatics evidence based practice eRepository to support global collaboration and knowledge sharing.
The evidence based practice WG is seeking global engagement and participation to contribute to and share knowledge and experiences. To this end it is proposed to conduct a workshop to explore the concepts and challenges and develop an action plan.

The workshop will be organized by:

Robyn Cook, MBA, RN, Co-Chair Evidence Based Practice Working Group IMIA SIGNI Director Epsilon Informatics, Australia and United Kingdom.
Charlotte Weaver, Co-Chair, Evidence Based Practice Working Group IMIA SIGNI.
Ulla-Mari Kinnunen, PhD, RN, Adjunct Professor, Senior Lecturer, Health and Human Services Informatics, Department of Health and Social Management, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, FinlandSocial Management, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland

[
Ms. Robyn Cook
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:30 - 17:00
547 AI - EHR
Artificial Intelligence and Electronic Health Records: Expectations, Use Cases and Caveats (S Schulz, A Berghold, D Kramer, K Denecke, M Ganninger)
The recent Artificial Intelligence (AI) hype has had considerable impact on research on electronic health records (EHRs). There are big expectations that the content of medical records constitutes a treasure trove for novel secondary use scenarios, particularly predictive analytics and clinical decision support, apart from optimising billing and reimbursement, large-scale observational research and cohort-building, but also improving human-computer interaction. There are good reasons to believe that the analysis of unstructured content from EHRs – like texts and images – can greatly benefit from AI approaches, provided enough training material is available. Other opinions have been raised that AI could constitute a shift in paradigm regarding the way how clinical research is conducted. The analytic insight into "big data" – mostly unstructured text – from millions of patients could not only be a source of new hypotheses, but would also provide enough data to investigate these hypotheses, without the costs and delays of prospective clinical trials.
This has raised various concerns. Ambitious efforts like IBM Watson have not lived up to the expectations that were raised. Very practically, the acceptance of clinical decision support by clinicians crucially requires explanatory systems instead of black-box approaches. In addition, clinical documentation and data management processes and standards vary between health care institutions to an extent that an AI-powered system that proves useful in one place, not necessarily can be re-used in another context. Real-world clinical data in almost all healthcare systems have been generated with a very specific intended use in mind, e.g. filing a claim to a healthcare payer. In almost all cases, secondary use was not considered by design and the data generating and management processes were optimized to fulfil the primary use only. Clinical data are not only heterogeneous and overly diverse, they also are biased in terms of coverage and granularity due to different, purpose-driven documentation needs and are sometimes plainly wrong. Finally, regarding clinical research, established and quality-assured methods of hypothesis testing and evidence generation within prospective trials must not be abandoned, and the validity of evidence generated from real-world-data needs to be carefully assessed.
Room: 4 (Location: Level 0, Number of seats: 108)
15:30 - 17:00
Artificial Intelligence and Electronic Health Records: Expectations, Use Cases and Caveats (Stefan Schulz, Andrea Berghold, Diether Kramer, Kerstin Denecke, Matthias Ganninger)
The recent Artificial Intelligence (AI) hype has had considerable impact on research on electronic health records (EHRs). There are big expectations that the content of medical records constitutes a treasure trove for novel secondary use scenarios, particularly predictive analytics and clinical decision support, apart from optimising billing and reimbursement, large-scale observational research and cohort-building, but also improving human-computer interaction. There are good reasons to believe that the analysis of unstructured content from EHRs – like texts and images – can greatly benefit from AI approaches, provided enough training material is available. Other opinions have been raised that AI could constitute a shift in paradigm regarding the way how clinical research is conducted. The analytic insight into "big data" – mostly unstructured text – from millions of patients could not only be a source of new hypotheses, but would also provide enough data to investigate these hypotheses, without the costs and delays of prospective clinical trials.
This has raised various concerns. Ambitious efforts like IBM Watson have not lived up to the expectations that were raised. Very practically, the acceptance of clinical decision support by clinicians crucially requires explanatory systems instead of black-box approaches. In addition, clinical documentation and data management processes and standards vary between health care institutions to an extent that an AI-powered system that proves useful in one place, not necessarily can be re-used in another context. Real-world clinical data in almost all healthcare systems have been generated with a very specific intended use in mind, e.g. filing a claim to a healthcare payer. In almost all cases, secondary use was not considered by design and the data generating and management processes were optimized to fulfil the primary use only. Clinical data are not only heterogeneous and overly diverse, they also are biased in terms of coverage and granularity due to different, purpose-driven documentation needs and are sometimes plainly wrong. Finally, regarding clinical research, established and quality-assured methods of hypothesis testing and evidence generation within prospective trials must not be abandoned, and the validity of evidence generated from real-world-data needs to be carefully assessed.
Mr. Stefan Schulz
Medizinische Universität Graz
Ms. Prof. Dr. Andrea Berghold
Medical University Graz
Mr. Dr. Diether Kramer
Steiermärkische Krankenanstaltengesellschaft m.b.H.
Mrs. Kerstin Denecke
Bern University of Applied Sciences
Mr. Matthias Ganninger
Roche Analytics International AG
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
548 mHealth Infectio
Smartphone Application for Active Surveillance of Infectious Diseases: Opportunities for Low-Resource Countries (MA Alvi, MZ Malik, S Iqbal, N Ali, Nu Mian)
Communicable diseases have exponential potential to spread into outbreaks and epidemics. This calls for building a system that can detect, report and respond to public health events within quickest possible time. Use of appropriate surveillance methods is a basic requirement for timely detection of disease outbreaks and control of epidemics. Pakistan, like rest of the low-resource countries, mainly relies on a fragmented and patchy surveillance, failing in epidemic detection related to emerging infectious disease threats.
mHealth and smartphone applications provide an opportunity for bridging this gap through strengthening both indicator-based and event-based surveillance, aiding the health systems in epidemic surveillance leading to timely and coordinated response and overcoming physical barriers. A customized and easy-to-use smartphone application (HealthAlert) is developed to cater the needs of communicable disease surveillance for rapid transmission of epidemic alerts from all types of healthcare providers and communities in low-resource countries through:
Alert generation – secure data transmission in a timely manner
Technical guidelines – easy access to standardized medical protocols
Support network – a way to advice from infectious diseases experts
Real-time notification – quick flow of information collection, synthesis and analysis for rapid response
The App is currently being piloted and it is an opportune time to discuss and update its implementation modalities through a workshop session at MIE Conference 2020. The will provide HealthAlert team a platform to share its theoratical rationale and intervention model with a global audience and through expert-level consultation, explore opportunities for easy implementation, low logistical burden and improved accessibility to previously inaccessible populations for disease surveillance and response functions.
Room: 13 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 60)
13:45 - 15:15
Smartphone Application for Active Surveillance of Infectious Diseases: Opportunities for Low-Resource Countries (Muhammad Adeel Alvi, Mariam Zahid Malik, Sarosh Iqbal, Nabeela Ali, Naeem uddin Mian)
Communicable diseases have exponential potential to spread into outbreaks and epidemics. This calls for building a system that can detect, report and respond to public health events within quickest possible time. Use of appropriate surveillance methods is a basic requirement for timely detection of disease outbreaks and control of epidemics. Pakistan, like rest of the low-resource countries, mainly relies on a fragmented and patchy surveillance, failing in epidemic detection related to emerging infectious disease threats.
mHealth and smartphone applications provide an opportunity for bridging this gap through strengthening both indicator-based and event-based surveillance, aiding the health systems in epidemic surveillance leading to timely and coordinated response and overcoming physical barriers. A customized and easy-to-use smartphone application (HealthAlert) is developed to cater the needs of communicable disease surveillance for rapid transmission of epidemic alerts from all types of healthcare providers and communities in low-resource countries through:
  • Alert generation – secure data transmission in a timely manner
  • Technical guidelines – easy access to standardized medical protocols
  • Support network – a way to advice from infectious diseases experts
  • Real-time notification – quick flow of information collection, synthesis and analysis for rapid response
The App is currently being piloted and it is an opportune time to discuss and update its implementation modalities through a workshop session at MIE Conference 2020. The will provide HealthAlert team a platform to share its theoratical rationale and intervention model with a global audience and through expert-level consultation, explore opportunities for easy implementation, low logistical burden and improved accessibility to previously inaccessible populations for disease surveillance and response functions.
Communicable diseases have exponential potential to spread into outbreaks and epidemics. This calls for building a system that can detect, report and respond to public health events within quickest possible time. Use of appropriate surveillance methods is a basic requirement for timely detection of disease outbreaks and control of epidemics. Pakistan, like rest of the low-resource countries, mainly relies on a fragmented and patchy surveillance, failing in epidemic detection related to emerging infectious disease threats.
Smartphone applications provide an opportunity for bridging this gap through strengthening both indicator-based and event-based surveillance, aiding the health systems in epidemic surveillance leading to timely and coordinated response and overcoming physical barriers. A customized and easy-to-use smartphone application (HealthAlert) is developed to cater the needs of communicable disease surveillance for rapid transmission of epidemic alerts from all types of healthcare providers and communities in low-resource countries through:
  • Alert generation – secure data transmission in a timely manner
  • Technical guidelines – easy access to standardized medical protocols
  • Support network – a way to advice from infectious diseases experts
  • Real-time notification – quick flow of information collection, synthesis and analysis for rapid response
The App is currently being piloted and it is an opportune time to discuss and update its implementation modalities through a workshop session at MIE Conference 2020. The will provide HealthAlert team a platform to share its theoratical rationale and intervention model with a global audience and through expert-level consultation, explore opportunities for easy implementation, low logistical burden and improved accessibility to previously inaccessible populations for disease surveillance and response functions.
Mr. Dr. Muhammad Adeel Alvi
Ms. Mariam Zahid Malik
Contech International Health Consultants
Ms. Sarosh Iqbal
Contech International Health Consultants
Ms. Nabeela Ali
JSI Research & Training Institute, Inc.
Mr. Naeem uddin Mian
Contech International Health Consultants
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
549 mHealth self mgt
mHealth Solutions to Support Self-Management of Multiple Chronic Conditions : a Brainstorming and Design Workshop (K Blondon, F Ehrler)
mHealth solutions for self-management of chronic diseases have shown potential in improving health outcomes, through patient empowerment. The design of these apps often focuses on a single disease or one aspect of a disease, whereas individuals often fact multiple chronic conditions. These conditions share many common features (e.g., medication adherence, monitoring), which require repeated data entry and lack of overall perspective for the user.We propose a user-centered workshop to discuss and conceive a mHealth solution for self-management of multiple chronic diseases, while taking into consideration a range of issues such as usability, confidentiality, privacy and information exchange to optimize each individual’s needs.
Room: 14 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 70)
13:45 - 15:15
mHealth Solutions to Support Self-Management of Multiple Chronic Conditions : a Brainstorming and Design Workshop (Katherine Blondon, Frederic Ehrler)
mHealth solutions for self-management of chronic diseases have shown potential in improving health outcomes, through patient empowerment. The design of these apps often focuses on a single disease or one aspect of a disease, whereas individuals often fact multiple chronic conditions. These conditions share many common features (e.g., medication adherence, monitoring), which require repeated data entry and lack of overall perspective for the user.We propose a user-centered workshop to discuss and conceive a mHealth solution for self-management of multiple chronic diseases, while taking into consideration a range of issues such as usability, confidentiality, privacy and information exchange to optimize each individual’s needs.
Mrs. Katherine Blondon
University Hospitals of Geneva
Mr. Frederic Ehrler PhD
University Hospitals of Geneva
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
552 Security
Security and Privacy of medical data in smart patient-centric healthcare systems (J Bowles)
Future-generation healthcare systems will be highly distributed, combining centralised hospital systems with decentralised home-, work- and environment-based monitoring and diagnostics systems. The integration and combination of data from such a variety of sources should bring benefits such as an expected reduction of healthcare costs and injury-related risks whilst enabling an improved provision of quality of service, and reducing the response time for diagnostics and treatments made available to patients. To make this vision possible, medical data must be accessed and shared over a variety of mediums including untrusted networks.
The aim of this workshop is to bring together an interdisciplinary audience with a shared interest to contribute to the development of adequate solutions to enable this vision
Room: 15 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 80)
Chair(s): Juliana Bowles
13:45 - 15:15
Security and Privacy of medical data in smart patient-centric healthcare systems (Juliana Bowles)
Future-generation healthcare systems will be highly distributed, combining centralised hospital systems with decentralised home-, work- and environment-based monitoring and diagnostics systems. The integration and combination of data from such a variety of sources should bring benefits such as an expected reduction of healthcare costs and injury-related risks whilst enabling an improved provision of quality of service, and reducing the response time for diagnostics and treatments made available to patients. To make this vision possible, medical data must be accessed and shared over a variety of mediums including untrusted networks.
The aim of this workshop is to bring together an interdisciplinary audience with a shared interest to contribute to the development of adequate solutions to enable this vision.
Mrs. Dr Juliana Bowles
University of St Andrews, School of Computer Science
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 16:45
509 Model DSS
Model-Based Decision Support And Context-aware Assistance (S Franke, J Gaebel, J Neumann, T Neumuth)
For complex diseases, the increasing number of available examinations and feasible therapies allows for more patient-specific therapy decisions with a higher probability of better outcomes and for therapy processes tailored to the individual patient. However, the large amount of often fragmented patient data and the multitude of available therapy options can quickly become too extensive to be fully considered in a clinician’s decision making. Predictive disease and patient-specific therapeutic decision models support clinicians in weighting the therapy options based on forecasted patient outcomes and on assessment of possible complications. Furthermore, dynamic workflow models support physicians along the whole clinical pathway and allow for assistance and automation during therapeutic processes.
In this tutorial, we describe the generation, validation, and application of two conceptually different models: probabilistic decision models derived from medical textbooks, clinical studies, therapeutic guidelines, and medical health records and probabilistic workflow models derived from data recordings and observations. We discuss both, the differences between both types of models but also their integration in the course of the goal of personlized medicine
Room: 16 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
13:45 - 16:45
Model-Based Decision Support And Context-aware Assistance (Stefan Franke, Jan Gaebel, Juliane Neumann, Thomas Neumuth)
For complex diseases, the increasing number of available examinations and feasible therapies allows for more patient-specific therapy decisions with a higher probability of better outcomes and for therapy processes tailored to the individual patient. However, the large amount of often fragmented patient data and the multitude of available therapy options can quickly become too extensive to be fully considered in a clinician’s decision making. Predictive disease and patient-specific therapeutic decision models support clinicians in weighting the therapy options based on forecasted patient outcomes and on assessment of possible complications. Furthermore, dynamic workflow models support physicians along the whole clinical pathway and allow for assistance and automation during therapeutic processes.
In this tutorial, we describe the generation, validation, and application of two conceptually different models: probabilistic decision models derived from medical textbooks, clinical studies, therapeutic guidelines, and medical health records and probabilistic workflow models derived from data recordings and observations. We discuss both, the differences between both types of models but also their integration in the course of the goal of personlized medicine.
Mr. Jan Gaebel
Universität Leipzig
Mr. Stefan Franke
Universität Leipzig
Ms. Juliane Neumann
Universität Leipzig
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
554 EHR
Building and Evaluating a Recommendation Engine Pipeline for Unstructured EHR Data (JH Bettencourt-Silva, M Sbodio, N Mulligan, S Braghin, K Fišter)
Recommender systems have not been extensively or effectively applied across healthcare scenarios despite significant state-of-the-art advancements. This workshop will introduce a recommendation engine pipeline to leverage unstructured data from electronic health records and it will take the participants through the various processes involved in its development. Through an interactive session, the participants will contribute to the assessment of recommendation models and engage in a discussion about the current and future trends for recommender systems in clinical practice.
Room: 17 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
Chair(s): Joao H Bettencourt-Silva
13:45 - 15:15
Building and Evaluating a Recommendation Engine Pipeline for Unstructured EHR Data (Joao H Bettencourt-Silva, Marco Sbodio, Natasha Mulligan, Stefano Braghin, Kristina Fišter)
Recommender systems have not been extensively or effectively applied across healthcare scenarios despite significant state-of-the-art advancements. This workshop will introduce a recommendation engine pipeline to leverage unstructured data from electronic health records and it will take the participants through the various processes involved in its development. Through an interactive session, the participants will contribute to the assessment of recommendation models and engage in a discussion about the current and future trends for recommender systems in clinical practice.
Ms. Asst. Professor Kristina Fišter
University of Zagreb School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health
Kristina Fišter is Assistant professor of medical informatics at Zagreb University School of Medicine, Andrija Štampar School of Public Health. She is a medical doctor, master of information sciences and doctor of science in the field of epidemiology.
Mr. Dr Joao H Bettencourt-Silva
IBM Research
http://www.clinicalinformatics.group.cam.ac.uk/people/joao-bettencourt-silva/ http://researcher.ibm.com/researcher/view.php?person=ie-jbettencourt
Thursday
30 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
565 Visual tools
The Use of Visual Tools in Face-to-face Patient-Physician Consultations (M Skogen, H Gilstad, A Faxvaag, PJ Toussaint)
As the patient-physician relationship migrates to digitalised communication platforms, there is an increased need to understand the existing—and developing—aspects of information transferal between members of this new dynamic. To address this need, our interdisciplinary research team investigates communication between patients and health care providers with respect to health literacy concerns.
This workshop expands upon our current research that focuses on the use of visual and information tools in face-to-face, patient-physician consultation realm. Through participatory discussions and exercises, this workshop attendees will gain insight into the role of digital and analogue visual tools as important factors in health communication.
Room: 18 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 120)
15:00 - 16:30
The Use of Visual Tools in Face-to-face Patient-Physician Consultations (Martha Skogen, Heidi Gilstad, Arild Faxvaag, Pieter Jelle Toussaint)
As the patient-physician relationship migrates to digitalised communication platforms, there is an increased need to understand the existing—and developing—aspects of information transferal between members of this new dynamic. To address this need, our interdisciplinary research team investigates communication between patients and health care providers with respect to health literacy concerns.
This workshop expands upon our current research that focuses on the use of visual and information tools in face-to-face, patient-physician consultation realm. Through participatory discussions and exercises, this workshop attendees will gain insight into the role of digital and analogue visual tools as important factors in health communication.
Ms. Dr. Martha Skogen
Norwegian University of Science & Technology (NTNU)
Ms. Heidi Gilstad Associate Professor
NTNU- Norwegian University of Science and Technology
Mr. Professor Arild Faxvaag
NTNU
Mr. Pieter Jelle Toussaint
NTNU
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
505 Mgt KB interop
Managing Knowledge-Based Interoperability in P5 Medicine (B Blobel, W Goossen, F Oemig, S Schulz, S Lotti, M Giacomini)
Room: 3 (Location: Level 0, Number of seats: 108)
Chair(s): Bernd Blobel
15:45 - 17:00
Managing Knowledge-Based Interoperability in P5 Medicine (Bernd Blobel, William Goossen, Frank Oemig, Stefan Schulz, Stefano Lotti, Mauro Giacomini)
According to the requested format for Workshop Proposals, no Abstract is required.
Mr. Prof. Dr. habil. Bernd Blobel
University of Regensburg
Tuesday
28 Apr
13:45 - 15:15
513 EFMI WG
How can EFMI working groups remain vibrant, inclusive and relevant? Ideas from the evaluation working group.
Room: 7/8 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 80)
Chair(s): Philip Scott
13:45 - 15:15
How can EFMI working groups remain vibrant, inclusive and relevant? Ideas from the evaluation working group. (Philip Scott, Elisavet Andrikopoulou, Annemiek SILVEN, Stephanie Medlock)
Not applicable - workshop
Mr. Dr Philip Scott
University of Portsmouth
Ms. Elisavet Andrikopoulou
University of Portsmouth
Ms. Annemiek SILVEN
Leiden University Medical Centre
Ms. Dr. Stephanie Medlock
University of Amsterdam
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
569 e-medication
Towards Shared e-Medication Lists and MedRec Tools – Overcoming technical and social interoperability challenges (B Bugnon, S Spahni, A Spinewine, C von Plessen)
The access of the current medication list is crucial for ensuring quality and safe care when the patient is seeing multiple clinicians across different settings. Digital technologies have a high potential to engage professionals and patients to create and maintain an updated and accessible medication list, i.e. the formal process of medication reconciliation (MedRec). In spite of clear evidence for engaging patients in MedRec, they are mostly treated as passive recipients of a medication list produced by and for professionals on national EHRs or in MedRec tools. The workshop will explore the strengths and current limitations of current experiences in different countries towards the use of shared e-medication list. We will discuss technical and social aspects of interoperability and the codesign of tools that can support safe and efficient MedRec with patients as coproducers.
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Benjamin Bugnon
15:45 - 17:00
Towards Shared e-Medication Lists and MedRec Tools – Overcoming technical and social interoperability challenges (Benjamin Bugnon, Stephane Spahni, Anne Spinewine, Christian von Plessen)
The access of the current medication list is crucial for ensuring quality and safe care when the patient is seeing multiple clinicians across different settings. Digital technologies have a high potential to engage professionals and patients to create and maintain an updated and accessible medication list, i.e. the formal process of medication reconciliation (MedRec). In spite of clear evidence for engaging patients in MedRec, they are mostly treated as passive recipients of a medication list produced by and for professionals on national EHRs or in MedRec tools. The workshop will explore the strengths and current limitations of current experiences in different countries towards the use of shared e-medication list. We will discuss technical and social aspects of interoperability and the codesign of tools that can support safe and efficient MedRec with patients as coproducers.
Mr. Benjamin Bugnon
Canton of Vaud, Public Health Department, Lausanne, Switzerland
Mr. Stephane Spahni PhD
Geneva University Hospitals (HUG)
Mr. Anne Spinewine
Université catholique de Louvain
Mr. Christian von Plessen
Canton of Vaud
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
571 Ident Blockch
Managing Civic Data and Identity: Exploring use cases for blockchain in healthcare (G Leeming, S Devaney)
Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLT) remain controversial topics within healthcare, but as DLT moves beyond the hype and becomes more mature the opportunities to develop new platforms for enabling patients in care and research. In order for the technology to become of value it is important to address the technical and socio-ethical challenges that can be both created and resolved through the use of DLT.
By presenting the work on CDIP the programme team hopes to be able to demonstrate some of the opportunities for further research in blockchain and health, and to promote discussion and feedback into the programme design and objectives in two key areas: Investigation of the legal, ethical and socio-technical requirements and the design of a core platform for Identity and Reputation
As well as contributed different views to the work and findings of the CDIP project specifically, it is hoped that the workshop will lay the groundwork for novel, international and multi-disciplinary collaboration in DLT research projects. The CDIP team hopes to be able to establish an international network of researchers who are interested in the use of DLT in health and research, and in taking forward the research and ideas generated in the workshop.
Room: 7/8 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 80)
Chair(s): Gary Leeming
15:45 - 17:00
Managing Civic Data and Identity: Exploring use cases for blockchain in healthcare (Gary Leeming, Sarah Devaney)
Blockchain and Distributed Ledger Technologies (DLT) remain controversial topics within healthcare, but as DLT moves beyond the hype and becomes more mature the opportunities to develop new platforms for enabling patients in care and research. In order for the technology to become of value it is important to address the technical and socio-ethical challenges that can be both created and resolved through the use of DLT.
By presenting the work on CDIP the programme team hopes to be able to demonstrate some of the opportunities for further research in blockchain and health, and to promote discussion and feedback into the programme design and objectives in two key areas: Investigation of the legal, ethical and socio-technical requirements and the design of a core platform for Identity and Reputation
As well as contributed different views to the work and findings of the CDIP project specifically, it is hoped that the workshop will lay the groundwork for novel, international and multi-disciplinary collaboration in DLT research projects. The CDIP team hopes to be able to establish an international network of researchers who are interested in the use of DLT in health and research, and in taking forward the research and ideas generated in the workshop.
Mr. Gary Leeming
University of Manchester
Ms. Sarah Devaney
University of Manchester
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
556 PHR
Patient Generated Data, PHR and EHR Strategies and Solutions for Health Information Management and Digital Transformation (R Ologeanu-Taddei, A Händel, M Abdelhak, C Chronaki, J Piera)
This workshop aims to present and discuss the state of art in different countries and for different actors (i.e. EHR companies) concerning the following questions:
What are the standards and certifications used by healthcare organizations to facilitate users (physicians, patients) identification and authentication solutions?
What are the solutions for ID management and authentication in a clinical ecosystem (clinical partners as hospitals, physicians' offices, providers of healthcare mobiles apps, providers of telemedicine platforms etc.)?
What are the mobile EHR solutions and how do they enable digital transformation? Here the comparison of several countries could be interesting.
Are EHR and PHR be compatible or integrated through national and cross border platforms (e.g. eHDSI) perhaps through the use of the patient summary and ePrescription cross border service.
Finally, what health information management strategies would ensure that health data captured will contribute to high-quality and high-value data sets anonymized for research use after being combined with other sources, e.g. European health data space without compromising the identity of individual patients.
The workshop is proposed by the Health Information Management Europe Working Group – EFMI HIME WG – in collaboration with the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), with the aim to work towards a joint white paper.
Room: 13 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Roxana Ologeanu-Taddei
15:45 - 17:00
Patient Generated Data, PHR and EHR Strategies and Solutions for Health Information Management and Digital Transformation (Roxana Ologeanu-Taddei, Angelika Händel, Mervat Abdelhak, Catherine Chronaki, Jordi Piera)
This workshop aims to present and discuss the state of art in different countries and for different actors (i.e. EHR companies) concerning the following questions:
What are the standards and certifications used by healthcare organizations to facilitate users (physicians, patients) identification and authentication solutions?
What are the solutions for ID management and authentication in a clinical ecosystem (clinical partners as hospitals, physicians' offices, providers of healthcare mobiles apps, providers of telemedicine platforms etc.)?
What are the mobile EHR solutions and how do they enable digital transformation? Here the comparison of several countries could be interesting.
Are EHR and PHR be compatible or integrated through national and cross border platforms (e.g. eHDSI) perhaps through the use of the patient summary and ePrescription cross border service.
Finally, what health information management strategies would ensure that health data captured will contribute to high-quality and high-value data sets anonymized for research use after being combined with other sources, e.g. European health data space without compromising the identity of individual patients.
The workshop is proposed by the Health Information Management Europe Working Group – EFMI HIME WG – in collaboration with the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA), with the aim to work towards a joint white paper.
Mrs. Roxana Ologeanu-Taddei
Ms. Angelika Händel
Universitätsklinikum Erlangen
Ms. Dr. Mervat Abdelhak
University of Pittsburgh
Mrs. Catherine Chronaki
Mr. Jordi Piera
Open University of Catalonia
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
568 patient care
Person-oriented care requires the transition from problem list to overarching care plan (F Cillessen, J Hofdijk)
To keep healthcare effective, accessible and affordable to all we need a fundamental paradigm shift. Self-management for prevention and care with the help of healthcare professionals, having a shared problem list, will play a significant role in this transition. Problem-oriented medical record keeping was introduced decades ago and has been widely adopted in Electronic Health Record systems of institutions. The problem list can support a meaningful patient–clinician dialogue that fits with the trend for care becoming more patient-centered. It also promotes shared-decision making ideally in line with the social problems of the patient. An overarching care plan could play an important role in the paradigm shift of health services delivering. How can we engage citizens and providers in the transition towards a real patient-centered problem list integrated in an overarching care plan according to the “Quadruple Aim” principles?
Room: 14 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 70)
Chair(s): Felix Cillessen
15:45 - 17:00
Person-oriented care requires the transition from problem list to overarching care plan (Felix Cillessen, Jacob Hofdijk)
To keep healthcare effective, accessible and affordable to all we need a fundamental paradigm shift. Self-management for prevention and care with the help of healthcare professionals, having a shared problem list, will play a significant role in this transition. Problem-oriented medical record keeping was introduced decades ago and has been widely adopted in Electronic Health Record systems of institutions. The problem list can support a meaningful patient–clinician dialogue that fits with the trend for care becoming more patient-centered. It also promotes shared-decision making ideally in line with the social problems of the patient. An overarching care plan could play an important role in the paradigm shift of health services delivering. How can we engage citizens and providers in the transition towards a real patient-centered problem list integrated in an overarching care plan according to the “Quadruple Aim” principles?
To keep healthcare effective, accessible and affordable to all we need a fundamental paradigm shift. Self-management for prevention and care with the help of healthcare professionals, having a shared problem list, will play a significant role in this transition. Problem-oriented medical record keeping was introduced decades ago and has been widely adopted in Electronic Health Record systems of institutions. The problem list can support a meaningful patient–clinician dialogue that fits with the trend for care becoming more patient-centered. It also promotes shared-decision making ideally in line with the social problems of the patient. An overarching care plan could play an important role in the paradigm shift of health services delivering. How can we engage citizens and providers in the transition towards a real patient-centered problem list integrated in an overarching care plan according to the “Triple Aim” principles?
Mr. Felix Cillessen
Hospital Rivierenland Tiel
Mr. Felix Cillessen
Radboud University Medical Centre, The Netherlands,
Mr. Jacob Hofdijk
Casemix-CQT Zorg en Gezondheid
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
521 Teledermo
Workshop: expertise and experience in teledermoscopy (F van Sinderen, L Peute, M Jaspers)
Skin cancer incidences, especially for melanoma, are rising [1]. This will likely increase the burden on the general practice regarding the number of consultations and obtaining diagnoses [1, 2]. Teledermoscopy (TDsc) has been suggested as a method to support general practitioners in the patient treatment and/or referral decisions. TDsc is defined as the provision of a consultation with a remote dermatologist based on digitally available dermatoscopic images [3]. Whether teledermoscopy (TDsc) is as accurate as face-to-face (FTF) consultations for detecting malignant skin lesions might be influenced by the expertise and experience of dermatologists in TDsc. Dermatologists’ experience with TDsc and accuracy of teleconsultations seem to be related [4]. If so, the diagnostic accuracy of TDsc could be increased by involving the more experienced teledermatologists (TDs) to assess the teleconsultations [4]. Where only basic instructions to GPs are needed to obtain clinical pictures, expertise with assessing dermoscopic pictures is deemed to be more important than image quality in assessing those teledermoscopy consultations accurately [5]. Currently, no guidelines exist to determine the required level of teledermatologists’ experience in and expertise with assessing TDsc consultations. Furthermore, experience in and expertise with TDsc of the TDs is rarely taken into account when evaluating TDsc in diagnostic outcome studies.
Room: 15 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 80)
Chair(s): Femke van Sinderen
15:45 - 17:00
Workshop: expertise and experience in teledermoscopy (Femke van Sinderen, Linda Peute, Monique Jaspers)
Skin cancer incidences, especially for melanoma, are rising [1]. This will likely increase the burden on the general practice regarding the number of consultations and obtaining diagnoses [1, 2]. Teledermoscopy (TDsc) has been suggested as a method to support general practitioners in the patient treatment and/or referral decisions. TDsc is defined as the provision of a consultation with a remote dermatologist based on digitally available dermatoscopic images [3]. Whether teledermoscopy (TDsc) is as accurate as face-to-face (FTF) consultations for detecting malignant skin lesions might be influenced by the expertise and experience of dermatologists in TDsc. Dermatologists’ experience with TDsc and accuracy of teleconsultations seem to be related [4]. If so, the diagnostic accuracy of TDsc could be increased by involving the more experienced teledermatologists (TDs) to assess the teleconsultations [4]. Where only basic instructions to GPs are needed to obtain clinical pictures, expertise with assessing dermoscopic pictures is deemed to be more important than image quality in assessing those teledermoscopy consultations accurately [5]. Currently, no guidelines exist to determine the required level of teledermatologists’ experience in and expertise with assessing TDsc consultations. Furthermore, experience in and expertise with TDsc of the TDs is rarely taken into account when evaluating TDsc in diagnostic outcome studies.
Ms. Femke van Sinderen
University of Amsterdam
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:45 - 17:00
532 mHealth
Challenges of developing and deploying mHealth software in multi-disciplinary research projects (M Machin, C Stockton-Powdrell, S Antrobus, G Lanzola, E Parimbelli, S Quaglini, N Peek)
In this workshop we will discuss the challenges of developing and deploying mHealth software in multi-disciplinary research projects. These challenges will be highlighted based on the experiences of two separate research groups from a range of different projects. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in an active discussion about approaches to tackling these challenges.
Room: 17 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
15:45 - 17:00
Challenges of developing and deploying mHealth software in multi-disciplinary research projects (Matthew Machin, Charlotte Stockton-Powdrell, Steven Antrobus, Giordano Lanzola, Enea Parimbelli, Silvana Quaglini, Niels Peek)
Topic
In this workshop we will discuss the challenges of developing and deploying mHealth software in multi-disciplinary research projects. These challenges will be highlighted based on the experiences of two separate research groups from a range of different projects. Participants will have the opportunity to engage in an active discussion about approaches to tackling these challenges.

Rationale
Developing mHealth software in multi-disciplinary research projects can present a unique set of challenges. This is particularly true when members of the team are from outside the health arena and are not used to working on health related projects. Challenges can include:
  • Getting the team to work as a cohesive whole.
  • Language / understanding barriers when working with people from a broad range of disciplines.
  • Ownership of use cases.
  • Sharing responsibilities across the team.
  • Identify and balance advantages and disadvantages.
  • Measure the outcomes, whether they be health or technical focused.
Outcome
Workshop participants will gain an improved understanding of the challenges in developing mHealth software in a diverse multi-disciplinary research project. They will have the opportunity to share their experiences of similar projects and to contribute to an active discussion about strategies for tackling the challenges.

Programme
The workshop will consist of 3 main sections: introduction, case study presentations and interactive discussion. The interactive discussion will form the core of the workshop and will provide an opportunity for all workshop attendees to engage in an interactive discussion about the challenges highlighted during the two case studies as well as their own experiences. Workshop delegates will come up with a sort of manifest about dos and don'ts to be used as a reference for mHealth projects.

The workshop facilitators will collect a list of the key challenges raised by the participants and the discussion will be focused on the most common issues.

Mr. Matthew Machin
Centre for Health Informatics, Division of Informatics, Imaging and Data Sciences, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, The University of Manchester
Tuesday
28 Apr
17:00 - 17:45
Opening
Opening ceremony
Room: 1 (Location: Level 1, Number of seats: 940)
Tuesday
28 Apr
17:45 - 18:30
Keynote
Richard Frackowiak
Room: 1 (Location: Level 1, Number of seats: 940)
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
531 Pers Med
Ultra-Personalized Medicine: N-of-1 Treatment in an N-of-1 World (C Petersen, R Abdolkhani, P DeMuro, R Pierce)
The natural extension of the increasing focus on personalized and precision medicine in patient-centered health care is ultra-personalized medicine, where the focus is on one person. Advances in medicine and technology have made it possible to produce novel therapies for individual patients with rare diseases. The use and understanding of patient-generated health data (PGHD) is important in these n-of-1 treatments. This panel will discuss how PGHD is essential in ultra-personalized medicine and how it should be managed to improve these initiatives. It will describe the case of milasen, which is believed to be the first such n-of-1 treatment. The panel will present a hypothetical case to highlight the key issues along with an ethical framework suitable for evaluation of such cases. Finally, the panel will address the policy and regulatory challenges and resource allocation in this space, and lead a discussion with the audience about these issues.
Room: 5 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Carolyn Petersen
08:30 - 10:00
Ultra-Personalized Medicine: N-of-1 Treatment in an N-of-1 World (Carolyn Petersen, Robab Abdolkhani, Paul DeMuro, Robin Pierce)
The natural extension of the increasing focus on personalized and precision medicine in patient-centered health care is ultra-personalized medicine, where the focus is on one person. Advances in medicine and technology have made it possible to produce novel therapies for individual patients with rare diseases. The use and understanding of patient-generated health data (PGHD) is important in these n-of-1 treatments. This panel will discuss how PGHD is essential in ultra-personalized medicine and how it should be managed to improve these initiatives. It will describe the case of milasen, which is believed to be the first such n-of-1 treatment. The panel will present a hypothetical case to highlight the key issues along with an ethical framework suitable for evaluation of such cases. Finally, the panel will address the policy and regulatory challenges and resource allocation in this space, and lead a discussion with the audience about these issues.
Ms. Carolyn Petersen
Ms. Robab Abdolkhani
Center for Digital Transformation of Health, University of Melbourne
Mr. Dr. Paul DeMuro
Ms. Dr. Robin Pierce
Tilburg University, Tilburg Law School
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
557 Monitoring
“Algorithmovigilance”: Considerations for Systematic Monitoring and Continuous Learning in an AI-Driven Healthcare Future (P Embi, J Platt, U Tachinardi, S Grannis, E Mendonca)
With rapid advances in artificial intelligence and associated expansion of algorithmically-driven, evidence-based dynamic decision support systems, our health system will quickly come to rely upon such systems for clinical decision making. This panel of five diverse informatics leaders will discuss the clinical, technological, ethical, and policy implications for a future AI-driven healthcare system that will require and benefit from such an approach to continuous monitoring and learning
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
08:30 - 10:00
“Algorithmovigilance”: Considerations for Systematic Monitoring and Continuous Learning in an AI-Driven Healthcare Future (Peter Embi, Jodyn Platt, Umberto Tachinardi, Shaun Grannis, Eneida Mendonca)
With rapid advances in artificial intelligence and associated expansion of algorithmically-driven, evidence-based dynamic decision support systems, our health system will quickly come to rely upon such systems for clinical decision making. This panel of five diverse informatics leaders will discuss the clinical, technological, ethical, and policy implications for a future AI-driven healthcare system that will require and benefit from such an approach to continuous monitoring and learning.
Ms. Eneida Mendonca
Ms. Peter Embi
Regenstrief Institute
Ms. Jodyn Platt
University of Michigan
Mr. Umberto Tachinardi
Regenstrief Institute
Mr. Shaun Grannis
Regenstrief Institute
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
510 Testing
Testing eHealth with the right perspective. Blending Usability, Clinical effect and Societal impact in evaluation. (S Jansen - Kosterink, M Broekhuis, L van Velsen)
For successful implementation of eHealth, a positive impact in daily clinical practice is important. In our opinion, an efficient evaluation of eHealth should start in parallel with the development of eHealth and focus on multiple endpoints to assess the usability, clinical effect and societal impact. In this workshop, we share with the attendants the first draft of our model for the continuous evaluation of eHealth and stretch the importance of collaboration between technical and clinical stakeholders during the research, development, evaluation and deployment phase of eHealth technologies to ensure successful implementation in daily clinical practice. Through discussions with the attendees about our model we aim to gather the missing elements to improve this model and to make it useful for the scientific community. The collaborative outcome of this workshop is a new model for the continuous evaluation of eHealth.
Room: 11 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 18)
Chair(s): Stephanie Jansen - Kosterink
08:30 - 10:00
Testing eHealth with the right perspective. Blending Usability, Clinical effect and Societal impact in evaluation. (Stephanie Jansen - Kosterink, Marijke Broekhuis, Lex van Velsen)
For successful implementation of eHealth, a positive impact in daily clinical practice is important. In our opinion, an efficient evaluation of eHealth should start in parallel with the development of eHealth and focus on multiple endpoints to assess the usability, clinical effect and societal impact. In this workshop, we share with the attendants the first draft of our model for the continuous evaluation of eHealth and stretch the importance of collaboration between technical and clinical stakeholders during the research, development, evaluation and deployment phase of eHealth technologies to ensure successful implementation in daily clinical practice. Through discussions with the attendees about our model we aim to gather the missing elements to improve this model and to make it useful for the scientific community. The collaborative outcome of this workshop is a new model for the continuous evaluation of eHealth.
Mrs. Dr. Stephanie Jansen - Kosterink
Roessingh Research and Development
Mrs. Marijke Broekhuis
Roessingh Research and Development
Mr. Lex van Velsen
Roessingh Research and Development
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
520 WHO digit
21st century WHO digital Health Classifications (C Celik, V Della Mea, M Donada, R Jakob, N Kostanjsek, A Martinuzzi, S Tu, CH van Gool
Purpose of the workshop is to introduce the current World Health Organization Family of International Classifications, ICD-11, ICD and ICHI and interrelations, as well as its underlying modelling components, and important practical applications. It will be demonstrated how the WHO Family of International Classifications has transformed from different health nomenclatures initially serving statistical needs only to a sophisticated system of interrelated terminologies serving multiple use cases, such as clinical documentation, billing and statistical reporting, fit for use in this digital era. Participants in the workshop will be prompted to engage by helping to design a whole new health information system for an imaginary new WHO member state, using elements of the WHO Family of International Classifications. The workshop includes a session for hands-on work in integration of the tooling, like the API in software.
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
Chair(s): Can Celik
08:30 - 10:00
21st century WHO digital Health Classifications (Can Celik, Vincenzo Della Mea, Marc Donada, Robert Jakob, Nenad Kostanjsek, Andrea Martinuzzi, Samson Tu, Coen H. van Gool)
Purpose of the workshop is to introduce the current World Health Organization Family of International Classifications, ICD-11, ICD and ICHI and interrelations, as well as its underlying modelling components, and important practical applications. It will be demonstrated how the WHO Family of International Classifications has transformed from different health nomenclatures initially serving statistical needs only to a sophisticated system of interrelated terminologies serving multiple use cases, such as clinical documentation, billing and statistical reporting, fit for use in this digital era. Participants in the workshop will be prompted to engage by helping to design a whole new health information system for an imaginary new WHO member state, using elements of the WHO Family of International Classifications. The workshop includes a session for hands-on work in integration of the tooling, like the API in software.
Mr. Can Celik
Word Health Organization
Mr. Vincenzo Della Mea
University of Udine
Mr. Robert Jakob
World Health Organization (WHO)
Mr. Nenad Kostanjsek
World Health Organization
Mr. Dr Andrea Martinuzzi
IRCCS E. Medea; Conegliano-Pieve di Soligo Reseacrh Centre; Research Branch of the WHO-FIC Italian collaborating Centre
Mr. Mr. Samson Tu
Stanford University
Mr. Coen H. van Gool PhD
National Institute for Public Health and the Environment
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 16:30
HES
University of Applied Science
Symposium
Room: 13 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 60)
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
40 Team
Design and Implementation of Health Information Technology for Teams (P Hoonakker, P Carayon, M Melles, M de Bruijne, S PELAYO, P Waterson, E Carman)
The focus of this panel is on the design, implementation and evaluation of health information technology (IT) to support teamwork. Most (health) IT is designed for individual use and tasks, while health care processes are increasingly performed by teams. Because current health IT may not systematically support team processes, we propose that a new effort is needed to design and implement health IT for teams, which has major theoretical and methodological implications. The expert panel of human factors specialists will present their experience with design, implementation and evaluation of health IT for teams in various contexts. This will be followed by a general discussion on theoretical and methodological implications for medical informatics.
Room: 16 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
08:30 - 10:00
Design and Implementation of Health Information Technology for Teams (Peter Hoonakker, Pascale Carayon, Marijke Melles, Martine de Bruijne, Sylvia PELAYO, Patrick Waterson, Eva Carman)
The focus of this panel is on the design, implementation and evaluation of health information technology (IT) to support teamwork. Most (health) IT is designed for individual use and tasks, while health care processes are increasingly performed by teams. Because current health IT may not systematically support team processes, we propose that a new effort is needed to design and implement health IT for teams, which has major theoretical and methodological implications. The expert panel of human factors specialists will present their experience with design, implementation and evaluation of health IT for teams in various contexts. This will be followed by a general discussion on theoretical and methodological implications for medical informatics.
Mr. Dr. Peter Hoonakker
Mrs. Pascale Carayon
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Mrs. Marijke Melles
Delft University of Technology
Ms. prof. dr. Martine de Bruijne
Amsterdam UMC, location VUmc & Amsterdam Public Health research institute
Ms. PhD Sylvia PELAYO
EVALAB INSERM CIC IT
Mr. Patrick Waterson
Loughbororough University
Ms. Eva Carman
University off Loughborough
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
515 Digital Health
Defining One Digital Health or how training the future generations of One Health professionals (A Benis, C Chronaki, A Moen, o Tamburis)
The One Digital Health paradigm is introduced as capable to integrate a broad computer science perspective (Digital Health) with a systemic approach of health and life sciences (One Health) that cover human health, animal health and the environment. It becomes therefore critical to figure out how the future generations of health informaticians are called to deal with the new scenarios stemming within such a broad panorama, addressing with a systemic approach its intrinsic complexity. Furthermore, reaching out to the citizens to build understanding and capacity to engage in health prevention activities, appropriate self-monitoring and collaboration to control and alleviate potential problems.
Room: 17 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
08:30 - 10:00
Defining One Digital Health or how training the future generations of One Health professionals (Arriel Benis, Catherine Chronaki, Anne Moen, oscar Tamburis)
The One Digital Health paradigm is introduced as capable to integrate a broad computer science perspective (Digital Health) with a systemic approach of health and life sciences (One Health) that cover human health, animal health and the environment. It becomes therefore critical to figure out how the future generations of health informaticians are called to deal with the new scenarios stemming within such a broad panorama, addressing with a systemic approach its intrinsic complexity. Furthermore, reaching out to the citizens to build understanding and capacity to engage in health prevention activities, appropriate self-monitoring and collaboration to control and alleviate potential problems.
Mr. Dr. Arriel Benis PhD
Holon Institute of Technology
PhD in Medical Informatics and Artificial Intelligence Senior Lecturer and Head of the "Business Intelligence and Automation" (BIA) laboratory and Co-Head of the "Industrial Automation and Internet of Things" (IIoT) at HIT - Holon Institute of Technology, Israel Chair of the EFMI WG HIIC - Health Informatics for Interregional Cooperation
Ms. - Catherine Chronaki Secretary General
HL7 Foundation
Ms. Professor Anne Moen RN, PhD, FACMI, FIAHSI
University of Oslo
Mr. oscar Tamburis
University of Naples "Federico II"
Thursday
30 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
523 Digital use
Supporting the use of digital services by decreasing digital exclusion and ensuring professionals’ commitment (T Heponiemi, A Kaihlanen, K Gluschkoff, S Kujala, WO Hackl)
The increasing use of digital health services demands changes from patients, professionals and organisations. The new services support patient self-management and consequently patients are expected to step into a more skilled and active role. There is a severe risk that new digital services will increase exclusion if the services are not sufficiently adapted to support the potentially vulnerable groups such as older people, migrants, substance abusers, and mental health service users. At the same time, professionals need to change their work processes and professional identity. The service processes need to be redefined to include the digitalised steps and support for patients. This requires fundamental changes in professionals’ work and organisational processes, and the lack of these changes may hinder the adoption of digital services.
This workshop explores challenges that digitalisation of health services has brought to patients, professionals and organisations. The goal of the workshop is to compare experiences from different countries and identify what has been done to ensure that a) digital services can be used by all patients including groups in risk of digital exclusion, and b) professionals are motivated to recommend the use of digital services to patients and guide patients in using these services.
The workshop collects international experiences on the topic and compares the situation in different countries. The results will be published to ensure the wide spreading of the workshop results. The workshop consists of presentations, collaborative working and collation of the results
Room: 5 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Tarja Heponiemi
08:30 - 10:00
Supporting the use of digital services by decreasing digital exclusion and ensuring professionals’ commitment (Tarja Heponiemi, Anu Kaihlanen, Kia Gluschkoff, Sari Kujala, Werner O Hackl)
The increasing use of digital health services demands changes from patients, professionals and organisations. The new services support patient self-management and consequently patients are expected to step into a more skilled and active role. There is a severe risk that new digital services will increase exclusion if the services are not sufficiently adapted to support the potentially vulnerable groups such as older people, migrants, substance abusers, and mental health service users. At the same time, professionals need to change their work processes and professional identity. The service processes need to be redefined to include the digitalised steps and support for patients. This requires fundamental changes in professionals’ work and organisational processes, and the lack of these changes may hinder the adoption of digital services.

This workshop explores challenges that digitalisation of health services has brought to patients, professionals and organisations. The goal of the workshop is to compare experiences from different countries and identify what has been done to ensure that a) digital services can be used by all patients including groups in risk of digital exclusion, and b) professionals are motivated to recommend the use of digital services to patients and guide patients in using these services.

The workshop collects international experiences on the topic and compares the situation in different countries. The results will be published to ensure the wide spreading of the workshop results. The workshop consists of presentations, collaborative working and collation of the results

Mrs. Prof Tarja Heponiemi
Finnish Institute for health and welfare
Mrs. Anu Kaihlanen
Finnish Institute for health and welfare
Mrs. Kia Gluschkoff
Finnish Institute for Health and Welfare
Mrs. Sari Kujala
Aalto University
Mr. Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Werner O Hackl
UMIT - University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology
Wednesday
29 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
526 Nursing data
Collect Once, Use Many Times: Make Better Decisions with Electronic Nursing Data via EHRs (R Ranegger, D Baumberger, J Rauch, WO Hackl, SN Musy, U Hübner)
Alike in other health domains, big data approaches making use of EHRs have been applied to nursing science and practice too. Yet, documentation is rarely regarded an opportunity but rather an onus that prevents nurses from taking care of their patients. The understanding of re-usable nursing data and their analysis in an ethically compliant and high quality manner is to be given a voice and to be offered a platform for debates. This workshop will address these fields and will contribute to developing the full scenario from data re-use, to knowledge discovery and clinical decision making. Five short kick-off speeches will set the scene for in-depth discussions with the workshop attendees. The results of this workshop will map the potentials of and experiences in nursing data analytics and inform future work.
Room: 20 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 33)
08:30 - 10:00
Collect Once, Use Many Times: Make Better Decisions with Electronic Nursing Data via EHRs (Renate Ranegger, Dieter Baumberger, Jens Rauch, Werner O Hackl, Sarah N. Musy, Ursula Hübner)
Alike in other health domains, big data approaches making use of EHRs have been applied to nursing science and practice too. Yet, documentation is rarely regarded an opportunity but rather an onus that prevents nurses from taking care of their patients. The understanding of re-usable nursing data and their analysis in an ethically compliant and high quality manner is to be given a voice and to be offered a platform for debates. This workshop will address these fields and will contribute to developing the full scenario from data re-use, to knowledge discovery and clinical decision making. Five short kick-off speeches will set the scene for in-depth discussions with the workshop attendees. The results of this workshop will map the potentials of and experiences in nursing data analytics and inform future work.
Ms. Mag. Dr. Renate Ranegger
UMIT – Private University for Health Sciences, Medical Informatics and Technology, Hall in Tirol, Austria LEP AG, St. Gallen, Switzerland
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
561 EBP
Towards Evidence Based Policy in digital health: How can the research community help? (C Chronaki, HMG Martins, A Moen, L Stoicu-Tivadar, C Jaffe, L Schaper)
In the digital economy and ongoing health care transformation, there is a proliferation of health-related data. However, there few widely accepted tools to shape digital health strategies and future oriented services. This panel of leading experts in digital health policy and health informatics research, will debate the role of data in producing evidence to share digital health policy. The expected outcome is improved synergies of the research community in Medical informatics with policy makers.
Room: 5 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Catherine Chronaki
11:00 - 12:30
Towards Evidence Based Policy in digital health: How can the research community help? (Catherine Chronaki, Henrique Manuel Gils Martins, Anne Moen, Lacramioara Stoicu-Tivadar, Charles Jaffe, Louise Schaper)
In the digital economy and ongoing health care transformation, there is a proliferation of health-related data. However, there few widely accepted tools to shape digital health strategies and future oriented services. This panel of leading experts in digital health policy and health informatics research, will debate the role of data in producing evidence to share digital health policy. The expected outcome is improved synergies of the research community in Medical informatics with policy makers.
Ms. - Catherine Chronaki Secretary General
HL7 Foundation
Mr. Henrique Manuel Gils Martins
SPMS
Ms. Professor Anne Moen RN, PhD, FACMI, FIAHSI
University of Oslo
Ms. Prof. Lacramioara Stoicu-Tivadar
University Politehnica Timișoara
Mr. MD, PhD Charles Jaffe
HL7
Ms. Louise Schaper
Australasian Institute of Digital Health
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
507 Eval
Evaluation in Medical Informatics: Using Examples From Different Domains to Form a Common Guideline (F Holl, M Fotteler, S Mueller-Mielitz, W Swoboda)
The eHealth sector has seen substantial growth in recent years.[1] This growth ranges from traditional medical informatics domains such as clinical IT systems to mobile health applications and smart ambient assisted living technologies. The growth was fueled by increased investment in new IT solutions and new technologies being developed.[2]
However, these new technologies and applications are often not evaluated. If evaluations are performed, they mostly focus on single aspects. A scoping review of the literature to determine how the impact of mHealth applications is measured has shown that no published mHealth projects has been holistically evaluated. Evaluations always focused on one aspect. User experience was assessed most often.[3]
The panel aims to give participants an overview of evaluation methods currently used in different domains of medical informatics and related fields and make them aware of the shortcomings of these methods. The second aim is to inform participants about the research that is currently conducted to improve evaluation methods in medical informatics with a holistic view. The diverse backgrounds of the panelists, ranging from medicine and public health to medical informatics and economics, are a good representation for the interdisciplinarity of medical informatics.
As the first presenter, Walter Swoboda will give an overview of recent developments in medical informatics and their impact. He will give examples of pitfalls of eHealth projects that could have been avoided if a thorough evaluation had been done beforehand.
Felix Holl will give an overview of the current state of the evaluation of mHealth applications. He will also present his work on the development of an evaluation framework for mHealth applications and highlight the need for evaluation of mHealth applications in both high-income and low- and middle-income settings.
The next panelist, Marina Fotteler, will present her work on collecting and synthesizing the existing evidence for ambient assisted living technologies. She will also highlight recommendations for new evaluation approaches for and ambient assisted living technologies.
Stefan Müller-Mielitz will finish the set of panel presentations with presenting the work of the eHealth working group of the German Health Economic society (dggö) on the development of a 12-point road map for the economic analysis of eHealth projects.[4]
Following the panel presentations, participants will be asked to share experiences with evaluation shortcoming and methodologies and frameworks they have used in their work. The goal of the discussion is to share experiences with evaluation methods and identify common themes for the development of an evaluation guideline
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Felix Holl
11:00 - 12:30
Evaluation in Medical Informatics: Using Examples From Different Domains to Form a Common Guideline (Felix Holl, Marina Fotteler, Stefan Mueller-Mielitz, Walter Swoboda)
The eHealth sector has seen substantial growth in recent years.[1] This growth ranges from traditional medical informatics domains such as clinical IT systems to mobile health applications and smart ambient assisted living technologies. The growth was fueled by increased investment in new IT solutions and new technologies being developed.[2]
However, these new technologies and applications are often not evaluated. If evaluations are performed, they mostly focus on single aspects. A scoping review of the literature to determine how the impact of mHealth applications is measured has shown that no published mHealth projects has been holistically evaluated. Evaluations always focused on one aspect. User experience was assessed most often.[3]
The panel aims to give participants an overview of evaluation methods currently used in different domains of medical informatics and related fields and make them aware of the shortcomings of these methods. The second aim is to inform participants about the research that is currently conducted to improve evaluation methods in medical informatics with a holistic view. The diverse backgrounds of the panelists, ranging from medicine and public health to medical informatics and economics, are a good representation for the interdisciplinarity of medical informatics.
As the first presenter, Walter Swoboda will give an overview of recent developments in medical informatics and their impact. He will give examples of pitfalls of eHealth projects that could have been avoided if a thorough evaluation had been done beforehand.
Felix Holl will give an overview of the current state of the evaluation of mHealth applications. He will also present his work on the development of an evaluation framework for mHealth applications and highlight the need for evaluation of mHealth applications in both high-income and low- and middle-income settings.
The next panelist, Marina Fotteler, will present her work on collecting and synthesizing the existing evidence for ambient assisted living technologies. She will also highlight recommendations for new evaluation approaches for and ambient assisted living technologies.
Stefan Müller-Mielitz will finish the set of panel presentations with presenting the work of the eHealth working group of the German Health Economic society (dggö) on the development of a 12-point road map for the economic analysis of eHealth projects.[4]
Following the panel presentations, participants will be asked to share experiences with evaluation shortcoming and methodologies and frameworks they have used in their work. The goal of the discussion is to share experiences with evaluation methods and identify common themes for the development of an evaluation guideline.
Mr. Felix Holl M.Sc.
Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences
Felix Holl is an MD/PhD student in medical informatics at the University of Munich and Ulm University in Germany. He is a research associate at Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences in Germany and an affiliate at the Institute for Global Health Sciences at the University of California, San Francisco, USA. His research focuses on the development of evaluation methods for mHealth applications. He also has a research interest in the use of informatics in global health.
Mrs. Marina Fotteler
Neu-Ulm University of Applied Sciences
Mr. Stefan Mueller-Mielitz
IEKF GmbH
Mr. Prof. Dr. Walter Swoboda
University of applied sciences Neu-Ulm
Since 2012 University lecturer at HNU Neu-Ulm, Germany 2007-2012 CIO at hospital of the University of Munich, Germany 2001-2007 CIO at hospital of the city of Munich 1999-2001 Physician at department of Neurology of the University of Munich 1992-1999 Scientific assistant at department of Epidemiology of the University of Munich
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
48 Simulation
Innovative Simulation of Telecare Alarm Services in Laboratory Environment (B Smaradottir, R Fensli, E Holen-Rabbersvik, U Knarvik, A Prinz)
This workshop addresses methodology and procedures for laboratory simulation of telecare alarm services. Practical outcomes and experiences are shared from simulation made in 2 recent research projects. The Model for Telecare Alarm Services project (2015-2017) applied user-based high-fidelity simulation where real end-users tested and evaluated a telecare application in clinical laboratory settings. The learning outcomes were later applied in the project High School Students as Co-researchers in eHealth (2018-2019), where high school students tested and simulated telecare scenarios. The authors are all experienced researchers within E-health and telecare.
Room: 11 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 18)
Chair(s): Berglind Smaradottir
11:00 - 12:30
Innovative Simulation of Telecare Alarm Services in Laboratory Environment (Berglind Smaradottir, Rune Fensli, Elisabeth Holen-Rabbersvik, Undine Knarvik, Andreas Prinz)
This workshop addresses methodology and procedures for laboratory simulation of telecare alarm services. Practical outcomes and experiences are shared from simulation made in 2 recent research projects. The Model for Telecare Alarm Services project (2015-2017) applied user-based high-fidelity simulation where real end-users tested and evaluated a telecare application in clinical laboratory settings. The learning outcomes were later applied in the project High School Students as Co-researchers in eHealth (2018-2019), where high school students tested and simulated telecare scenarios. The authors are all experienced researchers within E-health and telecare.
Ms. Dr. Berglind Smaradottir RN PHD
University of Agder, Norway
Researcher in eHealth with focus on User-centred Design and Evaluation in development of Health Information Technology. PhD in Information and Communication Technology, 2016. Master of Science in Telemedicine and eHealth, 2009. Bachelor of Nursing, 1996.
Mrs. Undine Knarvik
Norwegian Centre for E-health Research
Mr. Andreas Prinz
University of Agder
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
76 Snomed CT
Practical use of SNOMED CT for clinical data analytics (I Green, C Gutteridge, S Roy)
The aim of the workshop is to demonstrate the power of SNOMED CT for clinical data analytics using a synthetic data set showing ways of exploiting the descriptive logic underlying the terminology. We will show how the data extracts can be used to support actionable insights at all levels of clinical care. The workshop is aimed at clinicians and data analysts who would like to improve their understanding and ability to analyze the information available to them from point of care collected data in electronic health records. The workshop is also designed for health informaticians who wish to use publicly available open source tools such as Stanford’s Protege OWL editor rather than standard database tools such as SQL.
Following the demonstration, the audience will be encouraged to discuss the practical value of the approach, and how this can be highlighted to practicing professionals using SNOMEDCT-enabled systems, to enhance patient care and improve clinical practice
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
Chair(s): Ian Green
11:00 - 12:30
Practical use of SNOMED CT for clinical data analytics (Ian Green, Charles Gutteridge, Suzy Roy)

The aim of the workshop is to demonstrate the power of SNOMED CT for clinical data analytics using a synthetic data set showing ways of exploiting the descriptive logic underlying the terminology. We will show how the data extracts can be used to support actionable insights at all levels of clinical care. The workshop is aimed at clinicians and data analysts who would like to improve their understanding and ability to analyze the information available to them from point of care collected data in electronic health records. The workshop is also designed for health informaticians who wish to use publicly available open source tools such as Stanford’s Protege OWL editor rather than standard database tools such as SQL.

Following the demonstration, the audience will be encouraged to discuss the practical value of the approach, and how this can be highlighted to practicing professionals using SNOMEDCT-enabled systems, to enhance patient care and improve clinical practice
Mr. Ian Green
SNOMED International
Mr. Charles Gutteridge
SNOMED International and Barts Health, London
Ms. Suzy Roy
SNOMED International
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
500 Ethics
Why does Ethics Matter in Participatory Health? (K Denecke, C Bond, L Fernandez-Luque, E Gabarron, G Lopez-Campos)
Social media and participatory health has emerged as a promising tool for health, including developing diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions. In the realm of online health care delivery, artificial intelligence based counseling apps now enable patients to consult with a chatbot instead of an actual therapist. However, several ethical issues and implications became relevant with this shift to digital interventions and healthcare delivery. This panel will describe ethical issues related to recent developments in participatory health and social media including the digital exposome, importance of involving patients in the design of AI-based applications and ethics of social media research in healthcare.
Room: 16 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
Chair(s): Kerstin Denecke
11:00 - 12:30
Why does Ethics Matter in Participatory Health? (Kerstin Denecke, Carol Bond, Luis Fernandez-Luque, Elia Gabarron, Guillermo Lopez-Campos)
Social media and participatory health has emerged as a promising tool for health, including developing diagnostic tools and therapeutic interventions. In the realm of online health care delivery, artificial intelligence based counseling apps now enable patients to consult with a chatbot instead of an actual therapist. However, several ethical issues and implications became relevant with this shift to digital interventions and healthcare delivery. This panel will describe ethical issues related to recent developments in participatory health and social media including the digital exposome, importance of involving patients in the design of AI-based applications and ethics of social media research in healthcare.
Mrs. Kerstin Denecke
Bern University of Applied Sciences
Mrs. Carol Bond
Caring for Lifelong Health Research Centre, University of Wolverhampton
Mr. Luis Fernandez-Luque
Ms. Elia Gabarron
University Hospital of North Norway
Ms. Guillermo Lopez-Campos
Queen's University Belfast
Wednesday
29 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
495 collabo
Collaboration and cooperation as factors for mutual professional expertise growth in health informatics (A Benis, M Crisan-Vida, L Stoicu-Tivadar, S Darmoni)
Health Informatics is a multidisciplinary field. The European landscape is a mosaic of languages influenced by and influencing popular and professional cultures, and regulations. The European Federation for Medical Informatics comprises more than 30 partner-countries affiliated societies. This workshop aims to discuss the challenges of interregional cooperation and collaboration in the European healthcare informatics landscape and how they must be factors of mutual professional expertise growth. A particular focus will on the current activities of the working group “Healthcare Informatics for Interregional Cooperation” implementing a healthcare informatics thesaurus having for goal improving and facilitating the professional communication in this field and to reduce misunderstanding.
Room: 17 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
15:00 - 16:30
Collaboration and cooperation as factors for mutual professional expertise growth in health informatics (Arriel Benis, Mihaela Crisan-Vida, Lacramioara Stoicu-Tivadar, Stefan Darmoni)
Health Informatics is a multidisciplinary field. The European landscape is a mosaic of languages influenced by and influencing popular and professional cultures, and regulations. The European Federation for Medical Informatics comprises more than 30 partner-countries affiliated societies. This workshop aims to discuss the challenges of interregional cooperation and collaboration in the European healthcare informatics landscape and how they must be factors of mutual professional expertise growth. A particular focus will on the current activities of the working group “Healthcare Informatics for Interregional Cooperation” implementing a healthcare informatics thesaurus having for goal improving and facilitating the professional communication in this field and to reduce misunderstanding.
Mr. Dr. Arriel Benis PhD
Holon Institute of Technology
PhD in Medical Informatics and Artificial Intelligence Senior Lecturer and Head of the "Business Intelligence and Automation" (BIA) laboratory and Co-Head of the "Industrial Automation and Internet of Things" (IIoT) at HIT - Holon Institute of Technology, Israel Chair of the EFMI WG HIIC - Health Informatics for Interregional Cooperation
Ms. Mihaela Crisan-Vida
University Politehnica Timișoara
Ms. Prof. Lacramioara Stoicu-Tivadar
University Politehnica Timișoara
Mr. Prof. Stefan Darmoni
Rouen University Hospital
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
514 Tiger
TIGER goes ERASMUS: Implementing Problem Based Inter-professional Health Informatics Education (U Hübner, N Egbert, UM Kinnunen, R Cruz-Correia, M Abdelhak, A Händel, c BOYER, M Ball, G Mustata Wilson)
This workshop is part of the endeavours of TIGER (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) and is taking place in cooperation with members of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and the International Federation of Health Information Management Associations (IFHIMA) to lay out an actionable vision of inter-professional health informatics education. These efforts have informed the European ERASMUS + project eHealth4all@eu, which is translating amongst others TIGER’s core competency recommendations into a European curriculum. The intention of this workshop is to reflect (1) how problem-based learning (PBL) vignettes can serve as a focal point for learners, (2) how electronic media can become instrumental in achieving PBL and how these achievements can be assessed.
Room: 17 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 50)
Chair(s): Ursula Hübner
11:00 - 12:30
TIGER goes ERASMUS: Implementing Problem Based Inter-professional Health Informatics Education (Ursula Hübner, Nicole Egbert, Ulla-Mari Kinnunen, Ricardo Cruz-Correia, Mervat Abdelhak, Angelika Händel, celia BOYER, Marion Ball, Gabriela Mustata Wilson)
This workshop is part of the endeavours of TIGER (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) and is taking place in cooperation with members of the American Health Information Management Association (AHIMA) and the International Federation of Health Information Management Associations (IFHIMA) to lay out an actionable vision of inter-professional health informatics education. These efforts have informed the European ERASMUS + project eHealth4all@eu, which is translating amongst others TIGER’s core competency recommendations into a European curriculum. The intention of this workshop is to reflect (1) how problem-based learning (PBL) vignettes can serve as a focal point for learners, (2) how electronic media can become instrumental in achieving PBL and how these achievements can be assessed.
Ms. Prof. Dr. Ursula Hübner
Hochschule Osnabrück - University of Applied Sciences
Ms. Nicole Egbert
Forschungsgruppe Informatik im Gesundheitswesen - Hochschule Osnabrück
Mrs. Senior Lecturer Ulla-Mari Kinnunen
University of Eastern Finland
Mr. Prof. Ricardo Cruz-Correia
CINTESIS - Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto
Professor Ricardo João Cruz-Correia is an Auxiliary Professor at the Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade do Porto (FMUP). In 1996 achieved the degree of Computer Science at the Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade do Porto (FCUP), in 1998 achieved the Master Degree on Computer Science also at FCUP, and achieved the PhD at FMUP in 2008 on the Integration of Hospital Information Systems and achieved the Mirth Certification in 2014. He has collaborated on the implementation of several health information systems. He has lectured several disciplines on Medical Informatics of pre and pos graduation courses, and is currently supervising several master degrees on Medical Informatics.
Ms. Dr. Mervat Abdelhak
University of Pittsburgh
Ms. Angelika Händel
Universitätsklinikum Erlangen
Ms. Executive Director celia BOYER
Health On the Net Foundation
Ms. Marion Ball
IBM Research
Mr. PhD, MSc, FHIMSS Gabriela Mustata Wilson
University of Texas at Arlington
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
516 Accident Nr
International Standard Accident Number: Linking Accident & Emergency Data (J Wang, S Hackel, M Hahgi, J Jagieniak, J Schwarz, K Tahar, T Deserno)
The International Standard Accident Number (ISAN) project aims at linking unconnected data silos existing in emergency and rescue chain. The opportunities and challenges however in the newly established data flow is unclear. The perspectives of experts with different working experiences are therefore necessary for improved understanding. This workshop intends to introduce and improve the concept of linking accident and emergency data through a master case index -- the International Standard Accident Number (ISAN). The preliminary agenda for this workshop consists of four parts: P1: a presentation of the ISAN, P2: a demonstration of the use case: home emergency monitor; P3: a structured discussion of opportunities and challenges with respect to three aspects relating to the use case, and P4: a wrap up presentation of summarized perspectives (10 min). Through this workshop, we expect to promote the concept of ISAN and to summarize perspectives from different disciplinary experts by inspiring thinking and discussing with respect to a linked data-enhanced rescue chain. Networking between interested experts is encouraged and a dedicated community should be formed.
Room: 19 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 33)
11:00 - 12:30
International Standard Accident Number: Linking Accident & Emergency Data (Ju Wang, Siegfried Hackel, Mostafa Hahgi, Justin Jagieniak, Jonathan Schwarz, Kais Tahar, Thomas Deserno)
The International Standard Accident Number (ISAN) project aims at linking unconnected data silos existing in emergency and rescue chain. The opportunities and challenges however in the newly established data flow is unclear. The perspectives of experts with different working experiences are therefore necessary for improved understanding. This workshop intends to introduce and improve the concept of linking accident and emergency data through a master case index -- the International Standard Accident Number (ISAN). The preliminary agenda for this workshop consists of four parts: P1: a presentation of the ISAN, P2: a demonstration of the use case: home emergency monitor; P3: a structured discussion of opportunities and challenges with respect to three aspects relating to the use case, and P4: a wrap up presentation of summarized perspectives (10 min). Through this workshop, we expect to promote the concept of ISAN and to summarize perspectives from different disciplinary experts by inspiring thinking and discussing with respect to a linked data-enhanced rescue chain. Networking between interested experts is encouraged and a dedicated community should be formed.
Mr. Jonathan Schwarz
Peter L. Reichertz Institute for Medical Informatics, TU Braunschweig and Hannover Medical School
Mr. Thomas Deserno
University of Braunschweig
Wednesday
29 Apr
11:00 - 12:30
539 Workflow
An Integrative Model of Sociotechnical Design Lifecycle to Optimize Workflow and Implementation (D Borbolla)
Healthcare is a complex sociotechnical system, involving the interaction of both people and technology. Designing technical systems is a continuous process starting with identification of functional requirements at the individual level, user-centered design across users, and workflow integration at the system level. To be effective, the process needs to be seamless and iterative. In this tutorial we present a design a new design model that goes beyond user-centered design to more fully integrated all aspects of design with workflow and implementation. We cover the major components of the sociotechnical design lifecycle, specifically: identification of functional requirements, workflow assessment, system design prototyping, implementation and evaluation. We will also present various methods that can be used to support each of the components. The first methods covered will be cognitive task analysis (CTA) and ethnographic observation, which are tools commonly used to extract information about the users’ needs and the development of functional requirements. Then, we will discuss methods for workflow analysis, communication, and analysis of joint cognitive systems. Then, we will add components of design to address the core problem of supporting both automatic and deliberative cognitive processing at the same time. Finally, we will describe the principles of evaluation and usability testing. In each section, we will engage participants in hands-on activities, consult with participants in designing their own sociotechnical study, and supply an annotated reference file. Qualitative and experimental methods will be covered and discussed. In the last section we will discuss the overall challenges of implementing systems in clinical environments, the importance of establishing relationships with clinical and IT operations and the new domain of commercial clinical system optimization and other implementation science challenges.
Room: 20 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 33)
11:00 - 12:30
An Integrative Model of Sociotechnical Design Lifecycle to Optimize Workflow and Implementation (Damian Borbolla)
Healthcare is a complex sociotechnical system, involving the interaction of both people and technology. Designing technical systems is a continuous process starting with identification of functional requirements at the individual level, user-centered design across users, and workflow integration at the system level. To be effective, the process needs to be seamless and iterative. In this tutorial we present a design a new design model that goes beyond user-centered design to more fully integrated all aspects of design with workflow and implementation. We cover the major components of the sociotechnical design lifecycle, specifically: identification of functional requirements, workflow assessment, system design prototyping, implementation and evaluation. We will also present various methods that can be used to support each of the components. The first methods covered will be cognitive task analysis (CTA) and ethnographic observation, which are tools commonly used to extract information about the users’ needs and the development of functional requirements. Then, we will discuss methods for workflow analysis, communication, and analysis of joint cognitive systems. Then, we will add components of design to address the core problem of supporting both automatic and deliberative cognitive processing at the same time. Finally, we will describe the principles of evaluation and usability testing. In each section, we will engage participants in hands-on activities, consult with participants in designing their own sociotechnical study, and supply an annotated reference file. Qualitative and experimental methods will be covered and discussed. In the last section we will discuss the overall challenges of implementing systems in clinical environments, the importance of establishing relationships with clinical and IT operations and the new domain of commercial clinical system optimization and other implementation science challenges.
Mr. Damian Borbolla MD
Hospital Italiano de Buenos Aires
Wednesday
29 Apr
13:45 - 14:45
Keynote
Divya Chanders
Room: 1 (Location: Level 1, Number of seats: 940)
Wednesday
29 Apr
13:45 - 16:30
CERN
CERN Session
Room: 18 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 120)
Wednesday
29 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
553 Treat followup
What motivates patients with NCDs to follow up their treatment? (G Hartvigsen, A Henriksen, AZ Woldaregay, DZ Issom, K Sato, E Årsand, M Bradway)
Background: Patient engagement and self-management are increasingly regarded as vital to improved health outcomes for patients who suffer from chronic conditions.
Objectives: To understand the changing and expanding role of mHealth in patients’ self-management and care.
Methods: To discuss new ideas and directions in the field from existing literature and the presentation of successful use cases.
Results: Improved understand and knowledge of mHealth and eHealth tools (i.e. smartphones, tablets, medical sensors) to support self-management and patient education
Room: 5 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
15:00 - 16:30
What motivates patients with NCDs to follow up their treatment? (Gunnar Hartvigsen, André Henriksen, Ashenafi Zebene Woldaregay, David-Zacharie Issom, Keiichi Sato, Eirik Årsand, Meghan Bradway)
Background: Patient engagement and self-management are increasingly regarded as vital to improved health outcomes for patients who suffer from chronic conditions.
Objectives: To understand the changing and expanding role of mHealth in patients’ self-management and care.
Methods: To discuss new ideas and directions in the field from existing literature and the presentation of successful use cases.
Results: Improved understand and knowledge of mHealth and eHealth tools (i.e. smartphones, tablets, medical sensors) to support self-management and patient education.
Mr. Professor Gunnar Hartvigsen PhD
University of Tromsø & Norwegian Centre for Integrated Care and Telemedicine
Mr. André Henriksen
Mr. Ashenafi Zebene Woldaregay
UiT The Arctic University of Norway
Mr. David-Zacharie Issom
University of Geneva
Mr. Keiichi Sato
Illinois Institute of Technology
Mr. Eirik Årsand
University of Tromsø
Thursday
30 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
512 collabo
Cooperation and collaboration in health and medical informatics triggered and boosted by cultural differences (A Benis, M Crisan-Vida, R Marcilly, S PELAYO)
Developing new and innovative methods, models, and systems requires multidisciplinary teams having transversal and translational understandings and knowledge of healthcare customers, practitioners, organizations, and regulators. The European Federation for Medical Informatics Working Groups “Healthcare Informatics for Interregional cooperation” and “Human and Organizational Factors of Medical Informatics” will discuss about the impacts of cultural differences on the cooperation and collaboration processes in healthcare informatics. A particular attention will be on the triggers and the boosters allowing taking forward academic and industrial researches.
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
15:00 - 16:30
Cooperation and collaboration in health and medical informatics triggered and boosted by cultural differences (Arriel Benis, Mihaela Crisan-Vida, Romaric Marcilly, Sylvia PELAYO)
Developing new and innovative methods, models, and systems requires multidisciplinary teams having transversal and translational understandings and knowledge of healthcare customers, practitioners, organizations, and regulators. The European Federation for Medical Informatics Working Groups “Healthcare Informatics for Interregional cooperation” and “Human and Organizational Factors of Medical Informatics” will discuss about the impacts of cultural differences on the cooperation and collaboration processes in healthcare informatics. A particular attention will be on the triggers and the boosters allowing taking forward academic and industrial researches.
Mr. Dr. Arriel Benis PhD
Holon Institute of Technology
PhD in Medical Informatics and Artificial Intelligence Senior Lecturer and Head of the "Business Intelligence and Automation" (BIA) laboratory and Co-Head of the "Industrial Automation and Internet of Things" (IIoT) at HIT - Holon Institute of Technology, Israel Chair of the EFMI WG HIIC - Health Informatics for Interregional Cooperation
Ms. Mihaela Crisan-Vida
University Politehnica Timișoara
Mr. Romaric Marcilly
Ms. PhD Sylvia PELAYO
EVALAB INSERM CIC IT
Wednesday
29 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
566 IMIA Ethics
IMIA Certification in Ethics: Regional Relevance in a Global Program (P Lacroix, EH Kluge, P Ruotsalainen, N Al-Shorbaji)
Following a brief introduction of the proposed IMIA international ethics certification program for health information professionals, attendees in this workshop will be invited to discuss the design of a process for creating regional content and relevance for the global program. Topics for regional content include privacy, security, ethics and legal concepts. This workshop provides an opportunity for discussion and participation in the ongoing design and development of ethics certification program elements.
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Chair(s): Paulette Lacroix
15:00 - 16:30
IMIA Certification in Ethics: Regional Relevance in a Global Program (Paulette Lacroix, Eike-Henner Kluge, Pekka Ruotsalainen, Najeeb Al-Shorbaji)
Following a brief introduction of the proposed IMIA international ethics certification program for health information professionals, attendees in this workshop will be invited to discuss the design of a process for creating regional content and relevance for the global program. Topics for regional content include privacy, security, ethics and legal concepts. This workshop provides an opportunity for discussion and participation in the ongoing design and development of ethics certification program elements.
Ms. Paulette Lacroix
PC Lacroix Consulting Inc.
Wednesday
29 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
541 Med Error
Drifting into medication errors with automated dispensing cabinets: how to prevent it? A workshop for a medical informatics approach (V Lichtner, S PELAYO, J Westbrook
Automated dispensing cabinets in hospitals pose challenges to the prevention of medication errors associated with over-reliance on technology. This type of errors is relatively rare but a cause of serious harm to patients. The aim of this workshop is to discuss automation bias with medication cabinets and co-design with the audience medical informatics potential interventions for prevention.
Room: 11 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 18)
Chair(s): Valentina Lichtner
15:00 - 16:30
Drifting into medication errors with automated dispensing cabinets: how to prevent it? A workshop for a medical informatics approach (Valentina Lichtner, Sylvia PELAYO, Johanna Westbrook)
Automated dispensing cabinets in hospitals pose challenges to the prevention of medication errors associated with over-reliance on technology. This type of errors is relatively rare but a cause of serious harm to patients. The aim of this workshop is to discuss automation bias with medication cabinets and co-design with the audience medical informatics potential interventions for prevention.
Ms. Dr Valentina Lichtner
University College London and Macquarie University
Ms. PhD Sylvia PELAYO
EVALAB INSERM CIC IT
Ms. Professor Johanna Westbrook
Thursday
30 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
530 EFMI SSE
1st Joint Workshop EFMI WG THI - EFMI WG SSE: Omics facilities and Hospital Information Systems (J Delgado, M Giacomini, C Parra)
The EFMI Working Group on Security, Safety and Ethics (SSE) has been organizing a series of previous successful workshops held during past MIE Conferences, which include three joint workshops with the IMIA Working Group on Security in Health Information Systems (SiHiS).
On the other hand, the EFMI Working Group on Translational Health Informatics (THI) organized similar activities in previous EFMI events, the most recent of these is the Special Topic Conference of April 2019 in Hannover on “ICT for Health Science Research”, in which it was assessed that one the main gaps in the correct use of clinical and biological data in research is the little trust in the security systems applied in research applications. This originated the idea of the present Joint Workshop. This Joint Workshop at the MIE2020 expects to open a new series of Joint Workshops around the collaboration between the THI and SSE EFMI WGs.
The proposed workshop will include presentations from four recognized experts in omics, eHealth and security & privacy, each presentation lasting 15 minutes. There will be then 30 minutes for participants’ discussion. The objective of the workshop is to assist the Working Groups in receiving valuable feedback from participants that will help to further progress in their respective areas of work. The topic proposed for this Joint Workshop is around the impact that integration of new omics technologies has on the current hospital information systems.
The workshop sessions will provide the Working Groups the time required to present information on aspects such as the integration of new sequencing machines and their cost and impact with respect to current HIS, the need for keeping privacy and security throughout all the process, and the implementation of FAIR principles for Health Research.
Room: 7/8 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 80)
Chair(s): Jaime Delgado
15:00 - 16:30
1st Joint Workshop EFMI WG THI - EFMI WG SSE: Omics facilities and Hospital Information Systems (Jaime Delgado, Mauro Giacomini, Carlos Parra)
The EFMI Working Group on Security, Safety and Ethics (SSE) has been organizing a series of previous successful workshops held during past MIE Conferences, which include three joint workshops with the IMIA Working Group on Security in Health Information Systems (SiHiS).
On the other hand, the EFMI Working Group on Translational Health Informatics (THI) organized similar activities in previous EFMI events, the most recent of these is the Special Topic Conference of April 2019 in Hannover on “ICT for Health Science Research”, in which it was assessed that one the main gaps in the correct use of clinical and biological data in research is the little trust in the security systems applied in research applications. This originated the idea of the present Joint Workshop. This Joint Workshop at the MIE2020 expects to open a new series of Joint Workshops around the collaboration between the THI and SSE EFMI WGs.
The proposed workshop will include presentations from four recognized experts in omics, eHealth and security & privacy, each presentation lasting 15 minutes. There will be then 30 minutes for participants’ discussion. The objective of the workshop is to assist the Working Groups in receiving valuable feedback from participants that will help to further progress in their respective areas of work. The topic proposed for this Joint Workshop is around the impact that integration of new omics technologies has on the current hospital information systems.
The workshop sessions will provide the Working Groups the time required to present information on aspects such as the integration of new sequencing machines and their cost and impact with respect to current HIS, the need for keeping privacy and security throughout all the process, and the implementation of FAIR principles for Health Research.
Mr. Prof. Jaime Delgado
Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya
Mr. Mauro Giacomini
University of Genoa
Mr. Carlos Parra
Virgen del Rocío University Hospital.
Wednesday
29 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
528 FAIR HL7
FAIR in HL7: New standards for supporting Health Research (C Parra, A Martínez-Garcia, C Chronaki, G Cangioli, M Löbe, A Juehne, O Beyan)
Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable, or the FAIR data principles aim to guide scientific data management and stewardship and are relevant to all stakeholders in the digital health ecosystem. The objective of the FAIR4Health project is to facilitate and encourage the research community to FAIRify that is to augment, share and reuse datasets derived from publicly funded research initiatives, demonstrating the potential impact that the FAIR strategy will have on health outcomes and health research. Taking the FAIR4Health project as a starting point, in MedInfo 2019 conference, the FHIR for FAIR workshop reflected on ways that the HL7 FHIR standard can support the FAIRification process providing input to policy, standards, and research. The workshop concluded that the participants were keen to learn how to use HL7 FHIR to share personal health data within and without institutions. Participants demonstrated significant interest in learning more about how FHIR can support FAIR principles in the Health domain. This workshop will start with the findings of the first workshop and building on HL7 FHIR will explore stronger ties to other countries and regions..
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
15:00 - 16:30
FAIR in HL7: New standards for supporting Health Research (Carlos Parra, Alicia Martínez-Garcia, Catherine Chronaki, Giorgio Cangioli, Matthias Löbe, Anthony Juehne, Oya Beyan)

Findable, Accessible, Interoperable and Reusable, or the FAIR data principles aim to guide scientific data management and stewardship and are relevant to all stakeholders in the digital health ecosystem. The objective of the FAIR4Health project is to facilitate and encourage the research community to FAIRify that is to augment, share and reuse datasets derived from publicly funded research initiatives, demonstrating the potential impact that the FAIR strategy will have on health outcomes and health research. Taking the FAIR4Health project as a starting point, in MedInfo 2019 conference, the FHIR for FAIR workshop reflected on ways that the HL7 FHIR standard can support the FAIRification process providing input to policy, standards, and research. The workshop concluded that the participants were keen to learn how to use HL7 FHIR to share personal health data within and without institutions. Participants demonstrated significant interest in learning more about how FHIR can support FAIR principles in the Health domain. This workshop will start with the findings of the first workshop and building on HL7 FHIR will explore stronger ties to other countries and regions..
Mr. Carlos Parra
Virgen del Rocío University Hospital.
Wednesday
29 Apr
15:00 - 16:30
537 care pathway
How to map a patient journey in the most effective and efficient way? (M Sijm-Eeken, L Peute)
Patient journey mapping is a relatively new and upcoming methodology used in hospital quality of care improvement initiatives. Mapping a patient journey is a highly complex process in which the experiences with and interaction between the patient and the healthcare providers in all stages of a care trajectory are explored. A standard approach on how to perform the steps in the mapping process in the most effective and efficient way is lacking at present.
The Lean methodology has a proven track of record to optimize and standardize processes. Therefore we applied Lean onto the patient journey mapping process to optimize and standardize the process.
Workshop objectives
The first goal of this workshop is to explain to healthcare professionals and other experts in this field how we applied the Lean methodolog on the patient journey mapping process. The second goal is to share experiences with patient journey mapping and discuss improvements to the approaches used in different organizations based on a Lean analysis. In doing so we aim to perform a first explorative validation of our optimized approach to different healthcare organizational settings.
Room: 19 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 33)
Chair(s): Marieke Sijm-Eeken
15:00 - 16:30
How to map a patient journey in the most effective and efficient way? (Marieke Sijm-Eeken, Linda Peute)
Patient journey mapping is a relatively new and upcoming methodology used in hospital quality of care improvement initiatives. Mapping a patient journey is a highly complex process in which the experiences with and interaction between the patient and the healthcare providers in all stages of a care trajectory are explored. A standard approach on how to perform the steps in the mapping process in the most effective and efficient way is lacking at present.
The Lean methodology has a proven track of record to optimize and standardize processes. Therefore we applied Lean onto the patient journey mapping process to optimize and standardize the process.
Workshop objectives
The first goal of this workshop is to explain to healthcare professionals and other experts in this field how we applied the Lean methodolog on the patient journey mapping process. The second goal is to share experiences with patient journey mapping and discuss improvements to the approaches used in different organizations based on a Lean analysis. In doing so we aim to perform a first explorative validation of our optimized approach to different healthcare organizational settings.
Mrs. Drs. Marieke Sijm-Eeken
Ms. Dr. Linda Peute
Amsterdam UMC, University of Amsterdam
Wednesday
29 Apr
17:00 - 18:30
Science SLAM
Science SLAM
Room: 1 (Location: Level 1, Number of seats: 940)
Chair(s): Jessica Rochat
Tuesday
28 Apr
15:30 - 17:00
518 Classification
First Multilingual clinical NLP workshop (MUCLIN) (M Krallinger, C Parra, A Miranda, V Foufi, M Bjelogrlic, R Cornet, F Rinaldi)
There is an increasing interest in exploiting the content of unstructured clinical narratives by means of language technologies and text and data mining approaches. Structured clinical information, in the form of codified clinical data relying on controlled indexing vocabularies such as ICD10 is a key resource for statistical analysis techniques applied to patient data. Clinical natural language processing and AI-based document indexing strategies can result in resources useful for automatic clinical coding exploiting directly the unstructured content of EHRs. Due to the large volume of EHRs and its constant growth, the use of automatic systems to assist experts carrying out clinical coding tasks is becoming increasingly relevant to keep up with the pace of newly generated clinical texts.
A Gold Standard shareable dataset with high quality manual coding done by professionals with experience in clinical coding together with a proper quality and indexing consistency analysis is key to serve as training and evaluation data for automated clinical coding tools. Ideally, such tools should be able to automatically propose clinical concepts associated to ICD10 codes together with evidence text extracted directly from clinical texts to make the manual coding task much more efficient, consistent, systematic, traceable and interpretable.
Therefore, me propose the organization and discussion of a shared task (CodiEsp) that will explore the automatic assignment of ICD-10 codes (CIE10 in Spanish) to health-related documents. This automatically assigned codes will then be compared of assessed against the corresponding manual coding answers. Moreover, in addition to the CodiEsp session, the workshop proposal will include a 30 minutes panel discussion with experts and the workshop audience on automatic clinical document classification and information retrieval systems, resources and current challenges.
Some of the proposed topics for the discussion are:
-Generation of shareable training and evaluation data collections for clinical natural language processing (NLP) and automatic coding systems.
-Use of AI and deep learning methods applied to clinical text mining and NLP.
-Exploitation of unstructured content of EHRS for translational medicine approaches.
-Explainable IA strategies in clinical text mining.
-Evaluation metrics and scenarios for automatic clinical coding systems
-Multilingual clinical coding strategies
Room: 18 (Location: Level -1, Number of seats: 120)
Chair(s): Martin Krallinger
15:30 - 17:00
First Multilingual clinical NLP workshop (MUCLIN) (Martin Krallinger, Carlos Parra, Antonio Miranda, Vasiliki Foufi, Mina Bjelogrlic, Ronald Cornet, Fabio Rinaldi)
There is an increasing interest in exploiting the content of unstructured clinical narratives by means of language technologies and text and data mining approaches. Structured clinical information, in the form of codified clinical data relying on controlled indexing vocabularies such as ICD10 is a key resource for statistical analysis techniques applied to patient data. Clinical natural language processing and AI-based document indexing strategies can result in resources useful for automatic clinical coding exploiting directly the unstructured content of EHRs. Due to the large volume of EHRs and its constant growth, the use of automatic systems to assist experts carrying out clinical coding tasks is becoming increasingly relevant to keep up with the pace of newly generated clinical texts.

A Gold Standard shareable dataset with high quality manual coding done by professionals with experience in clinical coding together with a proper quality and indexing consistency analysis is key to serve as training and evaluation data for automated clinical coding tools. Ideally, such tools should be able to automatically propose clinical concepts associated to ICD10 codes together with evidence text extracted directly from clinical texts to make the manual coding task much more efficient, consistent, systematic, traceable and interpretable.

Therefore, me propose the organization and discussion of a shared task (CodiEsp) that will explore the automatic assignment of ICD-10 codes (CIE10 in Spanish) to health-related documents. This automatically assigned codes will then be compared of assessed against the corresponding manual coding answers. Moreover, in addition to the CodiEsp session, the workshop proposal will include a 30 minutes panel discussion with experts and the workshop audience on automatic clinical document classification and information retrieval systems, resources and current challenges.

Some of the proposed topics for the discussion are:

-Generation of shareable training and evaluation data collections for clinical natural language processing (NLP) and automatic coding systems.
-Use of AI and deep learning methods applied to clinical text mining and NLP.
-Exploitation of unstructured content of EHRS for translational medicine approaches.
-Explainable IA strategies in clinical text mining.
-Evaluation metrics and scenarios for automatic clinical coding systems
-Multilingual clinical coding strategies
Mr. Martin Krallinger
Thursday
30 Apr
08:30 - 16:30
Roche
Room: 6 (Location: Level 3, Number of seats: 60)
Thursday
30 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
524 Workflow
The Foreman’s Ulcer As Metaphor For Cmios: The Man-In-The-Middle (R Koppel, A Gettinger, P Winkelstein, W Hanson, III, M Rizer)
In sociology and in industrial relations research, “foreman’s ulcer,” refers to stresses experienced by and placed upon workplace foremen. Traditionally, foremen are supervisors who are neither executives nor workers--who must reflect the wishes of management while maintaining cordial (or at least acceptable) relations with workers. A frequent analogy is the sergeant who is neither officer nor grunt. The “ulcer” denotes they have responsibility but not control.
Do CMIOs have foremen’s ulcers? Although the metaphor is imperfect (CMIOs have physicians’ high status), they are none-the-less constantly obliged to negotiate for and among the clinical staff as they work with CIOs, CFOs, CMOs, CEOs. They also are go-betweens with EHR vendors and consultants implementing and/or optimizing HIT.
“Foreman’s ulcer” is not found in the medical literature. But we suggest it is an ideal way of examining the role and stresses of the CMIO. This panel will discuss the evolving role of the CMIO, the use and limitations of influence in that role, and will suggest methods by which the CMIO can avoid developing a foreman’s ulcer. We have assembled a panel of scholars and practitioners to discuss this topic.
Room: 12 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 25)
Chair(s): Ross Koppel
08:30 - 10:00
THE FOREMAN’S ULCER AS METAPHOR FOR CMIOS: THE MAN-IN-THE-MIDDLE (Ross Koppel, Andrew GETTINGER, Peter WINKELSTEIN, William HANSON, III, Milisa RIZER)
. In sociology and in industrial relations research, “foreman’s ulcer,” refers to stresses experienced by and placed upon workplace foremen. Traditionally, foremen are supervisors who are neither executives nor workers--who must reflect the wishes of management while maintaining cordial (or at least acceptable) relations with workers. A frequent analogy is the sergeant who is neither officer nor grunt. The “ulcer” denotes they have responsibility but not control.

Do CMIOs have foremen’s ulcers? Although the metaphor is imperfect (CMIOs have physicians’ high status), they are none-the-less constantly obliged to negotiate for and among the clinical staff as they work with CIOs, CFOs, CMOs, CEOs. They also are go-betweens with EHR vendors and consultants implementing and/or optimizing HIT.

“Foreman’s ulcer” is not found in the medical literature. But we suggest it is an ideal way of examining the role and stresses of the CMIO. This panel will discuss the evolving role of the CMIO, the use and limitations of influence in that role, and will suggest methods by which the CMIO can avoid developing a foreman’s ulcer. We have assembled a panel of scholars and practitioners to discuss this topic.
Mr. Professor Ross Koppel
University of Pennsylvania (USA)
Ms. Milisa RIZER
The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
Thursday
30 Apr
08:30 - 10:00
331 Event Processing
Improve AF chronic disease treatment and control using event base agents (A Fux, O Etzion, M Greenberg)
In this paper we introduce Perso-Track: an event-based decision support system. The system is focusing on improving the patient’s compliance to treatment by minimizing the required number of parameters they need to record, while maintaining enough data to allow the physician to monitor their condition. This is achieved by automatically recognizing predefined events, and adding necessary parameters only, according to need. The Perso-Track was tested on 23 AF chronic disease patient’s data, acquired in the mobiguide project. These patients were monitored by a medical team alongside the automatic system. Perso-Track proved to identify all the required events and issue the necessary adjustments requirements.
Room: 13 (Location: Level 2, Number of seats: 60)
08:30 - 10:00
Improve AF chronic disease treatment and control using event base agents (Adi Fux, Opher Etzion, Marianna Greenberg)
In this paper we introduce Perso-Track: an event-based decision support system. The system is focusing on improving the patient’s compliance to treatment by minimizing the required number of parameters they need to record, while maintaining enough data to allow the physician to monitor their condition. This is achieved by automatically recognizing predefined events, and adding necessary parameters only, according to need. The Perso-Track was tested on 23 AF chronic disease patient’s data, acquired in the mobiguide project. These patients were monitored by a medical team alongside the automatic system. Perso-Track proved to identify all the required events and issue the necessary adjustments requirements.
Mr. Dr. Adi Fux
Afeka - Tel Aviv Academic College of Engineering